Founders – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ Tue, 24 May 2022 09:53:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Founders – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ 32 32 Top European tech founders and investors launch charity OneUkraine to help Ukraine – TechCrunch http://www.maticezasovska.cz/top-european-tech-founders-and-investors-launch-charity-oneukraine-to-help-ukraine-techcrunch/ Tue, 24 May 2022 09:00:47 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/top-european-tech-founders-and-investors-launch-charity-oneukraine-to-help-ukraine-techcrunch/ A host of major European tech founders and investors are today backing the launch of OneUkrainea new charity that brings sustainable humanitarian aid to the people of Ukraine. OneUkraine will support Ukrainians at home and abroad, provide humanitarian aid and aim to rebuild Ukraine’s technological and wider infrastructure by SMEs and startups on the ground. […]]]>

A host of major European tech founders and investors are today backing the launch of OneUkrainea new charity that brings sustainable humanitarian aid to the people of Ukraine.

OneUkraine will support Ukrainians at home and abroad, provide humanitarian aid and aim to rebuild Ukraine’s technological and wider infrastructure by SMEs and startups on the ground. With many of the organization’s founding members being from Ukraine or having family ties to the country, the organization hopes to leverage direct access to local networks and real-world data on the country’s needs.

The organization claims to have evacuated more than 5,500 people, mostly women and children, and already provided aid worth over 4 million euros. He also built a Ukrainian school in Lithuania to provide education for refugees.

In a statement, Martin Reiter, CEO and co-founder of OneUkraine: “With many of our founders born and raised in Ukraine, we felt compelled to help our friends, family and colleagues. All of our founders have a proven track record leading or founding tech unicorns, and now we’re collectively doing what we do best: working quickly and efficiently at scale, delivering instant, much-needed humanitarian aid to the people of Ukraine. We believe we can best help by bringing an entrepreneurial, data-driven, and sustainable approach to the world of humanitarian aid, alongside other major relief efforts.

The founding team of OneUkraine:

• Martin Reiter: Martin ran Groupon Ukraine in 2011 and still has many friends in Ukraine. Martin previously held leadership positions at Airbnb and Wayfair Europe and co-founded mademoisellemartina.org to help evacuate Ukrainian women and children.

• Martina Kojic: Martina grew up in post-war Croatia, with the impact and trauma of the post-war situation shaping much of her childhood. Martina co-founded mademoisellemartina.org to help evacuate Ukrainian women and children.

• Markus Fuhrmann: Markus, whose wife and family are from Mariupol, Ukraine, is CEO and co-founder of GROPYUS, and previously co-founder of Lieferheld.de and Delivery Hero.

• Wolfgang Heigl: Wolfgang, who lives in Lithuania, is the founder of NFQ and HomeToGo.

• Viktoriya Tigipko: Viktoriya, born and raised in Kyiv, Ukraine, is the founding partner of TA Ventures and the founder of ICLUB Global, the angel investor network. She is the founder of WTECH, a network of over 5,000 women in technology, chairman of the board of the Ukrainian Startup Fund, and founder and president of the Odessa International Film Festival.

• Johannes Reck: Johannes, whose grandfather grew up in a small village that is now part of western Ukraine, is the co-founder and CEO of GetYourGuide.

• Dmitry Gorilovskiy: Dmitry, whose mother is from Rovno, Ukraine, has been organizing adoptions of Russian disabled orphans since 2014, when the Russian government banned foreign adoption. He is a serial founder of product design, IoT and machine learning companies such as Woodenshark and Moeco.

• Klaus Hommels: Klaus is the founder and chairman of Lakestar and one of Europe’s leading venture capitalists.

• Jens Hilgers: Jens, whose wife is Ukrainian, is a serial entrepreneur and has founded and managed international gaming and technology companies in Central and Eastern Europe and Asia. Among others, Jens is the Founder of GP at BITKRAFT Ventures and is the Co-Founder and President of G2 Esports.

• Alexa Sinyachova – CEO – Moeco. Alexa is Ukrainian. She is co-founder and CEO of Moeco and curator of WTech Berlin.

OneUkraine was set up as a long-term initiative and requires substantial donor funds. The cost of the operational team will be entirely financed by the personal funds of the founders, but OneUkraine invites donors and other partners to help finance the projects and effectively support Ukraine. The platform is incorporated in Germany as gGmbH, a charitable limited company and is audited by Ecovis, a leading charity auditor.

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Why founders should start talking to bankers and potential buyers now – TechCrunch http://www.maticezasovska.cz/why-founders-should-start-talking-to-bankers-and-potential-buyers-now-techcrunch/ Fri, 20 May 2022 23:30:14 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/why-founders-should-start-talking-to-bankers-and-potential-buyers-now-techcrunch/ The founders have received the note that the ground is moving under their feet at this time. What to do about it is the question. Already, teams plan to cut spending to preserve capital. They make painful staff cuts for the same purpose – or institute hiring freezes. But they should also think a lot […]]]>

The founders have received the note that the ground is moving under their feet at this time. What to do about it is the question. Already, teams plan to cut spending to preserve capital. They make painful staff cuts for the same purpose – or institute hiring freezes.

But they should also think a lot more about building relationships with bankers and big companies who might be interested in acquiring their startup, say two lawyers who work on both the buy and sell sides. deals, with both large corporate and venture backed companies, both of which have over 20 years of experience.

Indeed, to better understand some of the options founders may have, we spoke earlier today with Denny Kwon and Scott Anthony, who both represent white shoe law firm Covington & Burling (where the former US Attorney General Eric Holder is also a lawyer). They answered a series of questions we thought startups might be asking right now. Our cat has been slightly edited for length.

TC: How much has the world changed in recent weeks?

DK: There’s definitely a feeling of more pressure on sellers to close deals as quickly as possible given that there’s a lot of volatility in the market right now and they don’t know how buyers might react to a significant drop in their stock price. Small businesses also face the prospect of a slightly tougher fundraising market, so the alternatives for them are narrowing.

TC: Given that public equities are so volatile right now, are acquirers more or less inclined to offer equities as part of a transaction?

DK: It is much more difficult to price trades with a large inventory component in this market. Regardless of volatility, you don’t have a clear idea of ​​a stock’s inherent value, so all-cash trades are much more favorable to targets.

TC: Are targets currently able to make requests? What is the leverage effect of a startup whose options are dwindling?

DK: Whenever we see volatile markets, where valuations were incredibly high [and are] be reset, it always takes time for sellers’ expectations to reset as well, so although they may be temporary [lull in activity] Due to the market, if there is any “normalization” ahead, we are likely to see M&A activity, particularly when valuation expectations are reduced on both the buyer’s side and the seller’s side.

my sense [right now] is that buyers may view the market correction as potentially opportunistic, but sellers may not have the same expectations as they may be hoping for a rebound in the near future. Once sellers’ expectations drop and they continue to hear from VCs that financing may not be as available as it was 6-12 months ago, they will be even more pressured to decline offers. acquisitions that are coming.

TC: Do you see deals canceled as buyers seek to reprice previous deals to their advantage?

DK: The pending deals that I’m working on are continuing apace.

TC: We all hear – and read – already of very significant valuation declines. Do you have any idea how much value your customers have lost in recent weeks or if certain industries are being hit harder than others?

SA: There is pressure on valuations, but it is difficult to assess [the degree]. Granted, we have companies rushing to close valuations [before Russia invaded Ukraine] and [that period since] changed everyone’s expectations. I think companies are worried that investors will sit down and that will drive down valuations.

Businesses with revenue and good prospects will weather any downturn better – they always have. Sector wise it will depend but all stablecoin [debacle] didn’t help the crypto stuff.

TC: How important are antitrust regulators to your biggest clients?

DK: This is a priority for all practitioners, but there is a dichotomy in that some transactions are reportable and some are not. For those that are reportable—the threshold is about $100 million—we spend an incredible amount of time analyzing the potential for regulatory issues.

TC: How long does an M&A process take and when do the two parties agree on a price?

DK: From this initial step of a buyer, the delay can vary from a few weeks if there is alignment right away, up to several months if the target company wants to see if there are other interests. Much depends on how compelling that first offer may seem. Once you get a handshake on an assessment, it usually takes six to eight weeks to get a final agreement signed.

SA: If the [startup] is the one who makes the decision to find a buyer, and then the process – maybe they hire bankers, maybe they use board member connections to reach strategists – the process and the timing can be very different depending on how quickly they need the money and how quickly they can interest potential buyers. . . and size of business, but buyers will still perform their due diligence process.

TC: Let’s assume that mergers and acquisitions will be a bigger factor, given the cooling financing environment. If you had to advise a startup on the pros and cons of continuing, what arguments would you make?

DK: Many companies at an inflection point that need to raise funds to fund their growth or expansion are going to have a difficult decision to make, which is either to raise a new round where the valuation may not meet to their expectations, or [where they see a lot of dilution]or an M&A exit, where they see product now but lose on [potential] Upside down.

TC: Should startups that are open for sale reach out to anyone, or should they wait to see who approaches them? Some might worry that the value of their startup will drop as soon as they indicate they are willing to sell.

DK: I would advise startups to talk to bankers and maintain relationships with people at big companies that they know just because we could be in a longer-term correction, where funding becomes even more difficult than it does. has been for the last few months.

SA: Having relationships with bankers is prudent, so if you need to check the market, you already have those relationships. Additionally, staying in touch with larger customers and strategic partners who would be natural buyers for the business could short-circuit any type of sales process down the road.

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Longtime activist, NYPIRG founder Donald K. Ross dies at 78 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/longtime-activist-nypirg-founder-donald-k-ross-dies-at-78/ Wed, 18 May 2022 20:37:30 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/longtime-activist-nypirg-founder-donald-k-ross-dies-at-78/ ALBANY — Donald K. Ross, partner at lobbying firm Malkin & Ross and co-founder and former executive of NYPIRG and its many national affiliates, died last weekend after a brief illness. He was 78 years old. Ross was one of the original “Nader’s Raiders”, the group of consumer advocates and militant lawyers who worked with […]]]>

ALBANY — Donald K. Ross, partner at lobbying firm Malkin & Ross and co-founder and former executive of NYPIRG and its many national affiliates, died last weekend after a brief illness.

He was 78 years old.

Ross was one of the original “Nader’s Raiders”, the group of consumer advocates and militant lawyers who worked with Ralph Nader in the 1970s to challenge both the government and corporate giants like GM on a wide range of issues, including car safety and pollution.

Ross is credited with inspiring countless students to become activists, with many of his proteges taking up environmental, consumer and progressive causes as careers or lifelong hobbies.

“Donald was the Johnny Appleseed of his generation. There are thousands of activists dedicated to making the world a better place who grew from the seeds he sowed,” said his longtime lobbying partner, Arthur Malkin.

“He was truly a builder,” said NYPIRG executive director Blair Horner.

Horner met Ross in the late 1970s on Long Island when he was involved in the anti-nuclear movement, which spread after the Three Mile Island accident in 1979.


A Bronx native and product of parochial Catholic schools, Ross’ activism began at Fordham University where he organized an effort to revive Fordham’s then-dormant football team into a club sport.

After graduating in 1965, he served in the Peace Corps in Nigeria and then attended law school at New York University where he met Ralph Nader.

Ross eventually joined Nader’s Raiders, pushing for change on various public issues, including federal trade policies, environmental regulations, and consumer safety.

Spurred on by Three Mile Island, groups like NYPIRG targeted the nuclear power industry and Ross organized the No Nukes March on Washington, which echoed the anti-war protests of the 1960s and spawned to a national movement.

Much of Ross’ work over the years has focused on environmental and health issues, and his resume in this area is almost too long to list.

He helped lead Greenpeace, organized campaigns to help thalidomide victims in Europe, and worked to protect Alaska’s forests and fishing grounds from overexploitation.

“He really changed my life,” said Judith Enck, who, like Malkin and countless others, was inspired by Ross during her college years.
“I’ve always been impressed with his commitment to community service and the fact that he built this organization from the ground up,” Enck said of NYPIRG.

Enck became adviser to the governor and regional administrator of the EPA. She then launched Beyond Plastics, which describes its mission as “to end plastic pollution”.

In addition to environmental causes, Ross worked to reform the juvenile justice system and was, among other things, a trustee of the Rockefeller Family Fund.

“He always wanted to change as many lives as possible for the better,” said Ross’ widow, Helen Klein Ross, who is a poet and novelist.

She recalled how they met while fundraising at famed Studio 54 nightclub in Manhattan. He was there with other NYPIRG members.

She had just gotten out of a relationship and was due to meet colleagues at the advertising agency where she worked at the time.

It was a snowy night, however, and few of his work friends showed up.

They met in the locker room queue, went out for a drink and the rest was history.

“It was the first and last time either of us was there,” she said of Studio 54, adding that the couple’s two daughters have always enjoyed the dating story.

“We’ve been together ever since,” she added.

Klein Ross said there will be a memorial service Sunday near the couple’s home in Lakeville, Conn., and a larger tribute to them in the fall.

rkarlin@timesunion.com 518 454 5758 @RickKarlin

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HalloApp founders talk privacy and encryption after WhatsApp http://www.maticezasovska.cz/halloapp-founders-talk-privacy-and-encryption-after-whatsapp/ Mon, 16 May 2022 20:36:45 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/halloapp-founders-talk-privacy-and-encryption-after-whatsapp/ Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: An app that promises to be the anti-Facebook focuses on real relationships rather than ads and brands. Of course, this has already been tried. There’s a whole digital graveyard littered with the corpses of apps that have tried and failed to offer a compelling alternative to the […]]]>

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before: An app that promises to be the anti-Facebook focuses on real relationships rather than ads and brands. Of course, this has already been tried. There’s a whole digital graveyard littered with the corpses of apps that have tried and failed to offer a compelling alternative to the go-to social network. But maybe two former Facebook employees who were instrumental at WhatsApp know the secret to attracting users — and keeping them.

Neeraj Arora and Michael Donohue, who served as WhatsApp’s chief commercial officer and chief engineering officer respectively, launched HalloApp in late 2019, calling it “the first network for real relationships”. Arora helped negotiate the $22 billion sale of WhatsApp to Meta (then known as Facebook Inc.) in 2014. He realized after joining the social giant that the advertising-driven business model of Facebook was not serving its users and decided to create an alternative.

HalloApp has no ads. It also has no algorithmic feed and does not allow group chats with more than 50 people. The app only allows you to connect with registered users in your phone contacts. When you open the app, you’re greeted with refreshingly limited options: direct messages, group chats, and a home stream of messages only from your friends. Oh, and every message you send is encrypted, which Donohue said in a blog post is a “key step” in encrypting absolutely everything a user posts. HalloApp refused to release user numbers. According to Sensor Tower, the app has been downloaded 225,000 times on iOS and Android which it launched in November 2020. Obviously, it still has a long way to go to become ubiquitous.

Protocol spoke with Arora and Donohue about how working at Facebook informed their new company’s philosophy on social media, privacy and encryption, and their goal of making HalloApp as ubiquitous as WhatsApp. And, of course, we had to ask about the other CEO who wants to rid his social platform of ads – Elon Musk himself.

This interview has been edited and condensed for brevity and clarity.

Where did the idea for HalloApp come from?

Arora: As social products have evolved – Instagram, Snap, Facebook, TikTok – they have gone from connecting friends and family and people you know to following brands, to celebrities, to sports, to shopping . As if it had become a sort of huge shopping center where you sometimes hang out with your friends.

Donohue: I like the idea of ​​building a social platform based on phone numbers…I really feel like when I was at WhatsApp, I felt like people weren’t exploring phones as much mechanisms based on phone numbers and contact lists as they might be. So that’s the part that interested me the most.

The market is currently saturated with tons of social media apps. What distinguishes HalloApp from others?

Donohue: We focus enough on privacy and encryption. There are many encrypted messaging apps. I don’t know of many social platforms that are encrypted the same way.

Arora: How we look at user data, how we look at privacy, how we look at encryption, when all these [legacy platforms] were built many years ago, have completely changed now. If you talk to users today, the expectations of a social product are completely different. And that’s why I think they’re all inherited and stuck with their way of doing things. Their business model is glued to advertisements.

We’re in that phase where we’re moving from this world of apps into a new era of apps, where the companies being built are all about subscriptions, no data collection, encryption and privacy. I think the draw is that we’re moving from the old way of doing things to a new way of doing things.

So if HalloApp doesn’t rely on ads, how does it make money?

Arora: We got a taste of it on WhatsApp in the days leading up to our Facebook integration. At first, it was a one-time paid app on iOS and Android for $1. It was free for a year and a dollar a year thereafter. And we have experimented with this model in five countries, I think in the United States and in four European countries. I think we got pretty decent traction in terms of people going from free to paid.

In the mindset of users, they don’t mind paying for products they like if they are nominal and meet their needs. We haven’t really pinpointed exactly how our subscriptions will work, but overall we’re looking at having one product that will be free for everyone, and then we’ll create a set of premium features on top of that, and you can upgrade to a subscription, a monthly subscription, and pay for it.

Let’s go back to your philosophy on privacy. What made you want to create an app that limits the number of people you can connect with?

Arora: We’re talking about real relationships or people you actually know in your life, which excludes everyone else. I don’t know any celebrities in life – I know who they are, but they’re not relationships. Same thing with brands or politicians or athletes. There are public platforms like Twitter that fill this need…but having your address book as a starting point limits that world to the people you actually know. If you’ve gone through the trouble of having to add someone’s phone number to your address book, that’s a really good signal that at some point you’ve crossed paths in your life and you know.

People also create all kinds of anonymous accounts. I think having a real person with a real phone number behind every account adds that feeling of knowing who that person is. You are not talking to an unknown anonymous bot. This limits your interactions to people you know, then removes all the other garbage you see widely on public platforms.

HalloApp looks like the exact opposite of a company like Twitter, which could become a very different kind of platform under Elon Musk. What do you think of Musk’s Twitter deal?

Arora: I really like his tweets. Over the years, I think if you look at all the technology leaders of big companies, they don’t talk, like they don’t express their true thoughts anywhere online. All the things they tweet or update are carefully crafted PR messages. They don’t behave like real humans. What Elon is doing is very refreshing. He says what he thinks. I’m not saying that I like what he says or that I don’t like what he says, but what I really like is that he says what he thinks. I would love to see more and more people drop their PR…really talking about issues. I think Twitter is going to be a better business under him.

Donohue: We are also on the side of freedom of expression. But I think the rules are different when you have 80 million followers versus 10 people in the room that you can actually talk to right now.

What lessons have you learned on WhatsApp and how are you applying them to HalloApp?

Donohue: Most importantly, you don’t have to start in the United States. WhatsApp to this day is somehow famous for being ubiquitous everywhere except the United States. So if you go almost anywhere except a few Asian countries, everyone uses WhatsApp for texting. The model we’re building is similar enough to WhatsApp that we feel WhatsApp users are a fairly large group of people who understand what we’re building. So we really expect our popularity to start outside the United States.

Arora: We want to stay pretty global from day one. The other lesson we’ve learned that we root quite strongly here too is around small teams. You can create a massive product with lots of scale and lots of complex technology with just a handful of people. You don’t need to hire hundreds of people to build something in this space.

How has HalloApp evolved in the two years since its launch?

Donohue: We started before the pandemic, and going remote was not our goal. So it’s been quite frustrating for the past few years. We have been back in the office since June of last year. We tried to get everyone back to the office, and I think most people come around three days a week. It was just a challenge to adapt remotely when that really wasn’t our plan.

Arora: I think in our space there has been a bit more activity. I think people are quick to try new things. As usual they say that once these big companies are integrated like Facebook there is not enough space, but I disagree. I think there is always room to do something new and different. And we are seeing this activity more and more.

What does the future look like for HalloApp? What are your short and long term goals?

Arora: One of the things that we have been pursuing since our WhatsApp days is to focus on creating an amazing product that is simple and very utility-oriented. Less is more is always the thing. In the short term, that’s the goal. We spend our entire days developing our products, fixing bugs, making our servers better and faster to ensure that our product provides great value to our users.

In the long term, we would like to evolve. We’re not doing this to serve a small group of users or make it a small startup. For us, scale matters. Our vision is that as many people as possible on this planet use this product.

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Minjee Lee takes a one-shot lead in the final round of the Cognizant Founders Cup | LPGA http://www.maticezasovska.cz/minjee-lee-takes-a-one-shot-lead-in-the-final-round-of-the-cognizant-founders-cup-lpga/ Sun, 15 May 2022 01:36:36 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/minjee-lee-takes-a-one-shot-lead-in-the-final-round-of-the-cognizant-founders-cup-lpga/ CLIFTON, NJ (AP) — Minjee Lee seemed more worried about finishing her third round on a dreary, rainy day than keeping the Cognizant Founders Cup lead. The 25-year-old LPGA Tour scoring leader did both on Saturday as she moved in one lap to earn her first win of the year and seventh of her career. […]]]>

CLIFTON, NJ (AP) — Minjee Lee seemed more worried about finishing her third round on a dreary, rainy day than keeping the Cognizant Founders Cup lead.

The 25-year-old LPGA Tour scoring leader did both on Saturday as she moved in one lap to earn her first win of the year and seventh of her career.

Lee had an eagle-birdie on the back nine and shot a 3-under 69 to take a one-shot lead over Sweden’s Madelene Sagstrom on a day the Upper Montclair Country Club showed teeth with the wind picking up early and the rain falling on the leaders for the last 11 holes.

Lee, who had a three-stroke lead at the halfway point, was 17-under 199 after 54 holes.

“You know, I’ve been doing really well pretty much all year,” said Lee, who has two top-three finishes this year. “I worked hard on my putting and worked hard on everything so it would be really nice to see the outcome of a win.”

Sagstrom, the Swede who had the lead in the first round after a 63, had the best third round with a 67. The 29-year-old is aiming for her second win.

“I got a good score today, and if I keep playing my game, hitting good putts, giving myself good chances, you never know,” Sagstrom said. “But I just have to stay in the present. That’s really what I have to do.”

Sagstrom briefly tied for the lead with a birdie at the par-5 12th as Lee bogged the No. 11 after an errant tee shot.

Lee regained the lead with the eagle at No. 12 and the birdie at No. 13 on putts ranging from 15 to 18 feet.

“I think anyone can do it in half on this hole,” Lee said.

Lexi Thompson started the round tied with Sagstrom at 11 under and was only third, three strokes behind after a 69. She might have been closer to her first victory since 2019, but she narrowly missed at least five or six putts.

“I don’t even think that far,” Thompson said of her win. “I’m just going to go out tomorrow, take one shot at a time. I know I’ve done the job, so come here, be relaxed and commit to my golf shots; that’s all I can do. “

Angel Yin shot a 68 and moved up to fourth at 11 under. She had five birdies and a bogey.

“Actually, I left a lot of things there,” Yin said. “I did it pretty well, so I gave myself a lot of stares. It was really good. In fact, I left at least four in there that I felt like I could have done. .”

Ally Ewing, who was tied for second after two rounds, never did anything posting a 74. She was tied for fifth at 9 under with South Africa’s Paula Reto and Megan Khang.

Japan’s Nasa Hataoka, who won in Los Angeles last month, was in a group nine shots off the lead. Jennifer Kupcho, the winner at Mission Hills in the first major tournament of the season, also had 8 under.

Jin Young Ko of South Korea, a two-time defending champion and ranked No. 1, was a distant second at 5 under.

Anna Davis, the 16-year-old left who won the recent Augusta National Women’s Amateur, stayed at 4 under after shooting par.

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The founders of Ninety Percent share their inspirations http://www.maticezasovska.cz/the-founders-of-ninety-percent-share-their-inspirations/ Fri, 13 May 2022 10:57:54 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/the-founders-of-ninety-percent-share-their-inspirations/ Para My mother and my father My mother Sudha Mookerjee was a painter, played the violin, sang and was a deeply spiritual soul. She was from the Tagore family of Bengal in India, and her great-uncle was Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore, who named her after him and taught her to sing his songs. Besides culture […]]]>

Para

My mother and my father

My mother Sudha Mookerjee was a painter, played the violin, sang and was a deeply spiritual soul. She was from the Tagore family of Bengal in India, and her great-uncle was Nobel laureate Rabindranath Tagore, who named her after him and taught her to sing his songs. Besides culture and etiquette, one of the most important lessons my mother taught me was that kindness should be the keystone of life. My father Ajit Mookerjee was an author, educator, archaeologist, anthropologist and director of the National Crafts Museum of India in Delhi. He was a pioneer in writing about tantric science and philosophy which inspired international generations in the fields of art and media. My parents’ influence on art and design since I was a child has been profound and this led me to study exhibition design, then to work with architects in London, before venturing into the clothing and fashion, strongly promoted by Tom Singh, founder of New Watch Retailers.

Wildlife in India and Kenya

Visiting wildlife sanctuaries in India and Kenya since the 1980s has had an indelible impact on my outlook on life. Experiencing and seeing the incredible endangered wildlife and tribal legacies of these two countries helped me find my goal: Planet Comes First.

Shafiq

Meet My Para, My Muse!

I met Para in 1987, who was electric, when we both worked for the same company in London that supplied department stores. Para enlightened me about wildlife, organic food, world music and art. She was the first person to tell me directly that “Planet Comes First”. As we shared our thoughts, between aesthetic, social and environmental topics, it became clear that whatever we did together would be something we truly believed in. In 1996 Para and I started our own clothing sourcing company called Echo Sourcing. in London.

Children of Dhaka

In the early 1990s, during my sourcing trips to Bangladesh, I had an experience that I will never forget. I used to travel daily to Narayanganj, a city south of the capital Dhaka, to visit garment manufacturing units and textile factories. Every day, I had to pass a municipal dump and see children living off it. The stench 500 meters inside the car was so sickening that I wondered how they had done it. Para and I decided to do something. In April 2000, we established Children’s Hope in Bangladesh, which provides comprehensive assistance to underprivileged slum children and their families in the areas of education, nutrition and health care. Most of Ninety Percent’s garments are produced in our factory and textile factory, Echotex, in Bangladesh. Echotex was built on three pillars: Planet People Product.

Within six months of our operation, we were awarded the National Environmental Award of Bangladesh for 2010. Currently, Echotex is considered one of the largest LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Platinum certified manufacturing plants in the world. It is the first textile factory in Bangladesh to be a Road Map to Zero contributor, certified Platinum on the Higg Index and a certified Fair Trade manufacturing unit. This year, we are potentially becoming the first textile factory in Bangladesh to have zero liquid discharge, with 96% of our water to be recycled and 4% to evaporate.

Shafiq and Para

Live 8 and Make Poverty History

In 2005 Live 8 arrived, Make Poverty History was in full swing and people were marching to reduce third world debt. It was a momentous year for us and we started to wonder how big business was run and how governments were intertwined – lobbying and sleaze. We believed that traditional business models were about taking, not giving back, either to the planet or its people. As we only knew clothing and fashion, we created a fashion brand that had to challenge the status quo; based on contemporary products made to last, donating 90% of its distributed profits to the people who make the clothes and five causes focused on social and environmental justice: Big Life Foundation, Brac, Children’s Hope, War Child & Wild Aid.

Meeting with Nick Brandt and the Big Life Foundation

Nick Brandt is a huge inspiration to us, someone who stopped making music videos to give his life to document ecocide. Meeting him several times and discovering his amazing and impressive photography which gave us goosebumps. We heard about his charity, Big Life Foundation, and visited their project in Kenya to see the phenomenal work their organization does. Without much funding Big Life is dramatically reducing wildlife poaching, we want to do what we can to support him and this amazing cause.

Founder of Brac, Sir Fazle Hasan Abed

Brac works worldwide with over 150 million people and is currently the largest NGO. Talking to the great founder Sir Fazle Hasan Abed on several occasions has been an invaluable privilege. He educated us on the vision of challenging inherent systems by creating opportunities for women, men and children to take charge of their destiny to overcome poverty, against all odds. He once said, “Small is beautiful but without scale there isn’t much impact”. We have been touched by Sir Fazle’s inspiration in our lives and it cannot be overstated and has had an incredible impact on us.

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Robinhood co-founders are no longer billionaires after stocks drop 80% http://www.maticezasovska.cz/robinhood-co-founders-are-no-longer-billionaires-after-stocks-drop-80/ Wed, 11 May 2022 21:11:15 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/robinhood-co-founders-are-no-longer-billionaires-after-stocks-drop-80/ As many of their clients have learned over the past year, one minute the stock market is giving you a fortune…and the next it’s taking it away. Baiju Bhatt and Vladimir “Vlad” Tenev are the co-founders of Robinhood Markets, Inc., the stock/crypto trading platform. The duo founded Robinhood in 2015. The app found a huge […]]]>

As many of their clients have learned over the past year, one minute the stock market is giving you a fortune…and the next it’s taking it away.

Baiju Bhatt and Vladimir “Vlad” Tenev are the co-founders of Robinhood Markets, Inc., the stock/crypto trading platform. The duo founded Robinhood in 2015. The app found a huge user base after introducing commission-free stock trading, upending the likes of E*Trade which historically charged between $7 and $10 per stock trade .

In 2018, Robinhood had 3 million users. This additional growth was largely fueled by an ingenious referral program where current users received free shares in exchange for new users joining.

That same year, Baiju and Vlad became paper billionaires for the first time when the company raised funds at a valuation of $5.6 billion. Additional rounds of private funding would see the company’s valuation rise to $7.6 billion, then $8.6 billion, then $11.2 billion. In September 2020, the company completed its final round of private funding, raising $460 million at a valuation of $11.7 billion.

In July 2021, Robinhood went public. It ended its first day as a public company with a market capitalization of $30 billion. A month later, the company’s market capitalization reached $46 billion.

Vlad Tenev and Baiju each own 8% of Robinhood’s outstanding shares. When the company was worth $46 billion, on paper they were each worth officially…

$3.7 billion

(Photo by Cindy Ord/Getty Images for Robinhood)

Unfortunately, $46 billion would turn out to be (for now) the company’s highest valuation. When the company was worth $46 billion, Robinhood’s price per share was $55.

When markets closed on Tuesday afternoon, Robinhood’s stock price was $9.27.

That’s an 83% drop from its all-time high in August of last year. The stock has fallen 73% in the past six months alone. Robinhood’s current market capitalization is approximately $8 billion. That’s less than many of its recent private finance ratings.

With a market cap of $8 billion, Vlad and Baiju’s 8% stakes are currently worth around…

$640 million

It’s still an impressive amount of money, but it’s never fun to lose billionaire status.

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Too Faced founders cut ties with the brand http://www.maticezasovska.cz/too-faced-founders-cut-ties-with-the-brand/ Tue, 10 May 2022 05:02:44 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/too-faced-founders-cut-ties-with-the-brand/ THE WHAT? The Estee Lauder Companies has announced that Too Faced Cosmetics co-founders Jerrod Blandino and Jeremy Johnson have left the brand. The makeup brand will therefore be led by Tara Simon, who has been promoted to Global President, Too Faced, effective July 1, 2022. THE DETAILS In her elevated role as Global Brand President, […]]]>

THE WHAT? The Estee Lauder Companies has announced that Too Faced Cosmetics co-founders Jerrod Blandino and Jeremy Johnson have left the brand. The makeup brand will therefore be led by Tara Simon, who has been promoted to Global President, Too Faced, effective July 1, 2022.

THE DETAILS In her elevated role as Global Brand President, Tara will continue to empower her team to seize and realize fast-growing opportunities for the brand, while further contributing to the company’s makeup category strategy.

THE WHY ? Blandino and Johnson are reportedly embarking on “new entrepreneurial ventures and endeavors,” according to a statement released by The Estee Lauder Companies. ELC President and CEO Fabrizio Freda said, “Tara has been a fantastic leader at Too Faced since joining the brand two years ago, and I know she will continue to leverage of its expertise in brand creation to create an emotional connection with consumers through inspiring products and unique experiences. I am confident that under Tara’s leadership, Too Faced is well positioned for its next phase of growth. And we are very grateful for the outstanding work of Jerrod and Jeremy over the past six incredible years as part of the ELC family.

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Why the Mother’s Day founder hated the holidays http://www.maticezasovska.cz/why-the-mothers-day-founder-hated-the-holidays/ Sun, 08 May 2022 14:20:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/why-the-mothers-day-founder-hated-the-holidays/ (NEXSTAR) — Perhaps no one hated the more modern traditions of Mother’s Day as much as the woman who created it. Anna Jarvis, who successfully campaigned to establish a National Mother’s Day in the early 20th century, was ultimately so horrified by the commercialization of holiday that she tried to cancel everything. “Mother’s Day is […]]]>

(NEXSTAR) — Perhaps no one hated the more modern traditions of Mother’s Day as much as the woman who created it.

Anna Jarvis, who successfully campaigned to establish a National Mother’s Day in the early 20th century, was ultimately so horrified by the commercialization of holiday that she tried to cancel everything.

“Mother’s Day is desecrated,” Jarvis once said, according to an article in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch on Mother’s Day in 1944. “The telegraph companies with their ready-made greetings, the florists with their high-pressure campaigns and exorbitant prices, and the candy and greeting card manufacturers have racketeered my ideas.”

When Jarvis had the idea for what would become Mother’s Day, she envisioned a national day of remembrance and togetherness, to be observed with visits (if possible) and symbolized by her own mother’s favorite flower: a white carnation. But a few decades after she organized the first official celebration of Mother’s Day in 1908 – and successfully campaigned for national recognition in the years to come – she became unhappy with the way the holiday had taken shape in across the country.

Jarvis disliked greeting cards, calling them a “poor excuse for letters” favored by the “lazy”, and she believed candy was a meaningless gesture because “someone other than the mother usually eats them”.

In 1935, Jarvis even went to Washington, D.C., to berate the postmaster general for issuing commemorative Mother’s Day stamps, calling it “pure commercialism,” according to the Post-Dispatch article.

So how did Jarvis – who was no fan of candies, cards or even commemorative stamps – expect the nation to celebrate its mothers? Well, by going to visit him – or by sending him a long, handwritten letter.

“She said, you know, if you really want to do something for your mother… If you could go see her, you really should,” said Olive Ricketts, director of the Anna Jarvis Museum, in a 2016 interview with NPR. “But she said the second best thing to do was to write him a long, handwritten letter. Don’t use other people’s words to tell your mom how you feel because they don’t really know how you feel about your mom.

But by 1943, Jarvis had had enough of candy and cards. She began to demand a complete cancellation of Mother’s Day, but her efforts were cut short when she “went to Philadelphia General Hospital”, where workers observed that she was emaciated and almost blind, the Post-Dispatch reported. She was placed in Marshall Square Sanitarium in Westchester, where she lived until her death in 1948 at the age of 84.

Having never taken advantage of Mother’s Day, Jarvis also had no money when she entered the sanatorium. Executives in the greeting card and flower industry, however, took care of his bills.

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LPGA gains foothold in New York area with Founders Cup http://www.maticezasovska.cz/lpga-gains-foothold-in-new-york-area-with-founders-cup/ Fri, 06 May 2022 03:52:31 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/lpga-gains-foothold-in-new-york-area-with-founders-cup/ Lexi Thompson putts on the 18th green during the final round of the Palos Verdes Championship LPGA golf tournament on Sunday, May 1, 2022, in Palos Verdes Estates, Calif. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis) Ashley Landis PA CLIFTON, NJ The LPGA Tour’s Cognizant Founders Cup is moving to a new home this year a little closer to […]]]>

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Lexi Thompson putts on the 18th green during the final round of the Palos Verdes Championship LPGA golf tournament on Sunday, May 1, 2022, in Palos Verdes Estates, Calif. (AP Photo/Ashley Landis)

PA

The LPGA Tour’s Cognizant Founders Cup is moving to a new home this year a little closer to New York.

Just seven months after Jin Young Ko defended his 2019 title at Mountain Ridge County Club in West Caldwell, New Jersey, the event honoring the 13 founders of the LPGA Tour will be played next week at Upper Montclair Country Club in Clifton.

Even in New Jersey, it’s less than 15 minutes by car. And on a clear day, the Big Apple skyline will be visible.

Tournament director Scott Wood said there was talk of returning to Mountain Ridge, but playing the event in May posed a problem for the club.

“We wanted to stay close. We wanted to be able to have our footprint here in the north, you know, in the northern New Jersey area,” he said. “Cognizant is from Teaneck, New Jersey. So it all really started to snowball and really became a comfort factor for us to come back to a familiar place for LPGA fans, a nice facility.

The course is no stranger to tournaments hosting the PGA Tour, LPGA and a senior event featuring NFL players. Winners include Arnold Palmer, Nancy Lopez, Pat Bradley, Lorena Ochoa, Lee Trevino and Raymond Floyd.

The Founders Cup, which began in 2011 and had its first 10 events in Arizona, will have a $3 million prize pool. That’s the most money for a non-major, non-season-ending event on the LPGA Tour.

Cognizant, a technology solutions company, has committed to be the sponsor for the next three years, Wood said.

“They want to put the right measures in place so that they can have an impact on the players, for our tour and for women’s sports and can be a driving force for other companies to kind of ride on that board,” Wood said. . . “There is a big gap between men’s and women’s sports, and Cognizant is at the forefront of these changes.”

AW Tillinghast designed the original 18 holes and Robert Trent Jones Sr. did the renovation in the 1950s which extended it to 27 holes. This will be the first LPGA event at Upper Montclair since Ji Young Oh won the LPGA Sybase Classic in 2009.

Stacy Lewis, who will captain the US Solheim Cup team next year, was a touring rookie in 2009. She said he didn’t remember the course well, but she hopes things will start to pick up. engage when it resumes the journey.

When asked to captain the Solheim team, she joked that she hopes 12 Americans will play better than her next year.

Ko, who has already won twice on the circuit this year, will headline the field of 144 players in the 72-hole event.

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More AP Golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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