Program Recipients – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ Mon, 23 May 2022 09:52:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Program Recipients – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ 32 32 Eleven Students Receive John H. and Jane W. Donaldson Endowed Memorial Scholarships http://www.maticezasovska.cz/eleven-students-receive-john-h-and-jane-w-donaldson-endowed-memorial-scholarships/ Mon, 23 May 2022 05:08:05 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/eleven-students-receive-john-h-and-jane-w-donaldson-endowed-memorial-scholarships/ Photo submitted John and Eileen Donaldson (left) and Acting Dean of the College of Education and Health Professions, Kate Mamiseishvili (right), with 10 of the 11 scholarship recipients. Eleven University of Alberta students from the College of Education and Health Professions received John H. and Jane W. Donaldson Endowed Memorial Scholarships 2022-23 […]]]>



Photo submitted

John and Eileen Donaldson (left) and Acting Dean of the College of Education and Health Professions, Kate Mamiseishvili (right), with 10 of the 11 scholarship recipients.

Eleven University of Alberta students from the College of Education and Health Professions received John H. and Jane W. Donaldson Endowed Memorial Scholarships 2022-23 at a recent luncheon.

The recipients are Eric Ball, Jenna Brittingham, Kennedy Fuller, Jadyn Heinle, Amy Hill, Lauren Grace Lumpkin, Mackenzie Martin, Britney McGloflin, Margaret Molli, Elizabeth Oliver and David Stancil. In addition to a $10,000 scholarship, each received a medallion bearing the name of the scholarship and the school year.

The college did not officially recognize the 2021-22 scholars due to COVID-19 restrictions, so they were also celebrated at the May 17 event. The students are Catherine Casey, Melissa Corvera, Olivia Dickinson, Megan McClement, Emalie McCroddan, Rachael Price, Lindsey Rauber and Emma Woodrow. Casey attended the event in person.

Donaldson scholarships support graduate students during their one-year Master of Arts in Teaching internship. The master’s program requires a full-time classroom placement with a teacher-mentor and graduate coursework, making it difficult for students to hold part-time jobs. This scholarship helps students cover tuition fees or living expenses.

The scholarship fund was established by Col. John H. Donaldson, a 1938 alumnus of the College of Education and Health Professions, and his wife, Jane, in the mid-1990s. Donaldson met and married Jane Weathersby in 1940 and entered the United States Army as a first lieutenant a year later. After infantry training in Georgia and Texas, he was assigned to the 79th Infantry Division in Yuma, Arizona. On June 14, 1944, his division crossed the English Channel as part of the D-Day invasion forces which landed on Utah Beach. His 31 years of active military service took Donaldson to many countries and he eventually earned the rank of Colonel. He received the Distinguished Service Cross and the Purple Heart with three sprues and many other medals and awards.

Since 2003, Donaldson Scholarships have helped 277 students earn their Masters of Arts in Education. These students impacted nearly 100,000 students in classrooms across Arkansas and across the country.

Colonel Donaldson’s nephew and namesake, John Donaldson of Bentonville, shared his uncle’s remarkable life with about 75 luncheon guests. Donaldson’s wife, Eileen, various members of the Donaldson family, college management and faculty, and academics and their parents were on hand to celebrate the student recipients.

John L Colbert, a three-time graduate of the College of Education and Health Professions, was the keynote speaker. He holds a bachelor’s degree in special education and elementary education, a master’s degree in special education and a doctorate in educational leadership. Colbert’s career in public education spans 47 years, all in the Fayetteville Public School District. Her first role was a special education teacher at Bates Elementary. He then held managerial positions, served as assistant superintendent, and in 2018 was hired as superintendent. Colbert plans to retire at the end of the 2022-23 school year.

Colbert, who said he couldn’t limit himself to speaking from the podium, walked among the guests, drawing laughter and nods of approval. His overarching message: The most crucial teaching tool is the relationship educators establish with their students.

Since graduates of the Master of Arts in Teaching program are well-prepared for success in the classroom, public schools in Arkansas and surrounding states regularly recruit them. Colbert told scholars they were in a good position to land full-time teaching jobs early while doing an internship as part of the master’s program.

About the College of Education and Health Professions: The College of Education and Health Professions offers advanced academic degrees along with professional development opportunities and learning communities to serve the education and health systems of Arkansas and beyond. The college provides training and experiences for a variety of professional roles, ranging from community mental health counselors to teachers and school leaders. Adult education and higher education programs, as well as educational technology and sports management, offer a wide range of options. In addition to education-related opportunities, the college prepares nurses, speech-language pathologists, health educators and administrators, recreation professionals, rehabilitation counselors, and human performance researchers.

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Number of booster dose recipients reaches 43.9 million http://www.maticezasovska.cz/number-of-booster-dose-recipients-reaches-43-9-million/ Sat, 21 May 2022 16:24:34 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/number-of-booster-dose-recipients-reaches-43-9-million/ Jakarta (ANTARA) – At least 43.9 million Indonesian citizens received the third or booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Saturday, according to the COVID-19 Handling Task Force. According to data from the working group received by ANTARA here on Saturday, the number of recipients of the third dose increased by 349,398 on Saturday, bringing […]]]>

Jakarta (ANTARA) – At least 43.9 million Indonesian citizens received the third or booster dose of the COVID-19 vaccine on Saturday, according to the COVID-19 Handling Task Force.

According to data from the working group received by ANTARA here on Saturday, the number of recipients of the third dose increased by 349,398 on Saturday, bringing the total number to 43,911,285.

Meanwhile, the number of fully immunized people, or those who received two doses of the vaccine under the government’s national immunization programme, rose by 132,018 to 166,764,720.

Based on the data, the number of people who were inoculated with the first dose increased by 45,565, bringing the total number of beneficiaries to 199,844,276.

As part of efforts to build community immunity against COVID-19, the Indonesian government launched a national vaccination program on January 13, 2021, targeting up to 208,265,720 citizens across the country. President Joko Widodo was the first to be vaccinated under the program.

Previously, the head of the COVID-19 management task force at the Indonesian Medical Association (IDI), Professor Zubairi Djoerban, said that the risk of a potential increase in COVID-19 cases after the period of The 2022 Eid return exodus was lower compared to in previous years, as Indonesia’s vaccination rate was already high.

He pointed out that during the return period from Eid in previous years, the number of people vaccinated against COVID-19 in Indonesia was still low, which led to an increase in the number of cases after the return period.

People who have been vaccinated have a lower risk of contracting COVID-19, and if infected, they do not have severe symptoms.

The first case of COVID-19 in Indonesia was confirmed in March 2020. According to data from the COVID-19 Management Task Force, as of May 21, 2022, the country has recorded a total of 6,052,363 cases of COVID- 19. 5,892,126 recoveries and 156,519 deaths.

Related news: Mutual recognition of vaccination: EU approves use of PeduliLindungiapp
Related News: Indonesia to Integrate Child Immunization Data into PeduliLindungi

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Capito and Manchin announce $890,000 for five West Virginia arts and music programs http://www.maticezasovska.cz/capito-and-manchin-announce-890000-for-five-west-virginia-arts-and-music-programs/ Thu, 19 May 2022 23:55:51 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/capito-and-manchin-announce-890000-for-five-west-virginia-arts-and-music-programs/ WASHINGTON DC – Today, U.S. Senators Shelley Moore Capito (RW.Va.) and Joe Manchin (DW.Va.), members of the Senate Appropriations Committee, announced $890,700 from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for five arts and music programs across West Virginia. “West Virginia is rich in culture and history, and I think it’s important that we work […]]]>

WASHINGTON DC – Today, U.S. Senators Shelley Moore Capito (RW.Va.) and Joe Manchin (DW.Va.), members of the Senate Appropriations Committee, announced $890,700 from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) for five arts and music programs across West Virginia.

“West Virginia is rich in culture and history, and I think it’s important that we work to maintain the creative spirit and proud traditions of our state for generations to come,” Senator Capito said. “It is great to see support flowing our way that will help grow our symphonies and orchestras, and strengthen regional and traditional arts programs across the Mountain State. I commend the recipients for their commitment to strengthening our communities. through the arts, and I look forward to continuing to support these programs through my work on the Senate Appropriations Committee.

“West Virginia has a vibrant arts and music culture, and our entire state takes great pride in the important role artists and musicians play in our communities. I am pleased that the NEA is investing in these five programs to support our artists as they pursue their passions and enrich West Virginia and the country as a whole. I look forward to seeing the positive impacts of this funding and as a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee, I will continue to advocate for resources to strengthen music and arts programs across Mountain State,” said Senator Manchin.

Individual awards listed below:

  • $820,700 – West Virginia Division of Culture and History/Arts Section, Charleston, WV

    • This funding will support national and regional arts programs, services and activities.

  • $35,000 – West Virginia Humanities Council, Charleston, West Virginia

    • This funding will support a folk and traditional arts learning program.

  • $15,000 – West Virginia Symphony Orchestra

    • This funding will support a plan to organize a statewide performance tour.

  • $10,000 – City of Buckhannon, West Virginia

    • This funding will support musical performances associated with the World Association of Marching Show Bands.

  • $10,000 – Wheeling Symphony Society, Wheeling, West Virginia

    • This funding will support the youth concert tour through West Virginia, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

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$150 Chicago Stimulus Checks: How to Get It http://www.maticezasovska.cz/150-chicago-stimulus-checks-how-to-get-it/ Tue, 17 May 2022 13:46:45 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/150-chicago-stimulus-checks-how-to-get-it/ andreas160578 / Pixabay To help citizens cope with rising fuel prices, the City of Chicago will soon offer stimulus checks to low-income residents. These Chicago stimulus checks will come in the form of prepaid gas cards and public transit cards. Eligible residents will receive either a $150 prepaid gas card or a $50 transit pass. […]]]>
andreas160578 / Pixabay

To help citizens cope with rising fuel prices, the City of Chicago will soon offer stimulus checks to low-income residents. These Chicago stimulus checks will come in the form of prepaid gas cards and public transit cards. Eligible residents will receive either a $150 prepaid gas card or a $50 transit pass.

Play quizzes 4

Chicago stimulus checks: Who will get them?

The Chicago stimulus checks are part of the Chicago Moves program, which was approved by the city council by a very narrow margin (26-23) on April 27. Under the program, the city will send out 50,000 preloaded gas cards of $150 each. and 100,000 preloaded transit cards of $50 each.

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“Chicago Moves is a financial assistance program providing $12.5 million in transportation relief to Chicagoans in need,” the program’s website says.

About 75% of these cards will go to low-income communities or residents of community areas facing higher mobility challenges. The rest will go to eligible beneficiaries in the rest of the city.

Gas card recipients will be able to use them at stations in the city of Chicago. Travel cards can be redeemed at Ventra vending machines at CTA stations, Ventra outlets or on the Ventra website or mobile app.

How to Apply for the Chicago Moves Program

Authorities began accepting applications for the Chicago Moves program starting April 27. Those who meet the conditions will be entered into a lottery. The state will use the lottery to determine which recipients will receive the cards between May and September.

To be considered for Chicago stimulus checks, an applicant must be a Chicago resident, be at least 18 years old, and have a household income at or below 100% of the area’s median income.

Additionally, those applying for the gas card must have a current and valid city sticker with accurate postal information for their vehicle. The lottery will take place the second week of May, June, July, August and September.

“To be considered for each month’s lottery, applications must be submitted by the first day of that month,” the program’s website says. “If you are not selected for the draw of the month, you are automatically registered for the next one. Only one application will be accepted. »

You can enter the lottery online at the Chicago.gov/ChicagoMoves website or in person at any Chicago Public Library location. You can also mail your application (ATTN: Dept. of Finance: Chicago Moves, 121 N. Lasalle St., Floor 7).

Those selected for the gas or transit card will be notified by email. Selected recipients will receive the card by post or can pick it up at the town hall. Applicants must specify their preferred delivery method when completing the application.

Updated

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Virginia to review 2 million for Medicaid eligibility Virginia set to review 2 million for ‘safe haven’ Medicaid eligibility http://www.maticezasovska.cz/virginia-to-review-2-million-for-medicaid-eligibility-virginia-set-to-review-2-million-for-safe-haven-medicaid-eligibility/ Sun, 15 May 2022 20:10:52 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/virginia-to-review-2-million-for-medicaid-eligibility-virginia-set-to-review-2-million-for-safe-haven-medicaid-eligibility/ Virginia is about to begin a comprehensive 12-month review of over 2 million people in its Medicaid program for the elderly and disabled and low-income families – it’s just a matter of when. The federal government program, supercharged by from Virginia extension of eligibility in 2019 under the Affordable Care Act< /a>added more than half […]]]>

Virginia is about to begin a comprehensive 12-month review of over 2 million people in its Medicaid program for the elderly and disabled and low-income families – it’s just a matter of when.

The federal government program, supercharged by from Virginia extension of eligibility in 2019 under the Affordable Care Act< /a>added more than half a million people since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, drawing on more than $1 billion additional federal funding to provide health care to people who cannot afford to pay.

“It has been our honor for Medicaid to serve as a safe haven for those covered by Medicaid during the pandemic,” said Karen Kimseydirector of the Department of Medical Assistance Serviceswhich administers the state’s Medicaid program.

But a reckoning is looming as the federal government prepares to end the public health emergency as early as mid-July, forcing states that received emergency assistance during the pandemic to redetermine the eligibility of those registered on their Medicaid lists.

It promises to be a long and laborious process, which could result in up to 20% of Medicaid recipients losing coverage because they are no longer eligible.

“It’s 400,000 people [in Virginia],” mentioned Doug Graygeneral manager of the Virginia Public Health Plan Association, whose managed care companies provide most of the coverage. “That’s a lot of people.”

“The size and importance of this one is quite daunting,” Gray said.

State agencies working with nonprofit health care advocates, medical providers and insurance companies are trying to make the process less daunting for people who rely on Medicaid for medical coverage.

The state has already begun running advertisements on social media and other digital media – in English and Spanish – which will soon be followed by radio and television to inform recipients of the process and ask them to make sure that their contact information is up to date so they can stay well informed.

The campaign also mails information to more than 1.1 million households.

“We want to let people know what’s coming,” Kimsey said.

They’re also trying to avoid confusion and misinformation about what the so-called “rollout” process means for Medicaid recipients, who tend to be among the most vulnerable people in communities across Virginia – and among the most misunderstood.

About 832,000 Medicaid beneficiaries in Virginia are children and about 814,000 are adults of working age. More than 153,000 beneficiaries are disabled or blind and almost 85,000 are over 65 years old. Demographically, 54% are white and 35% are black, with 5% Asian. About 55% are women and 4% are Hispanic.

Children and youth up to age 19 make up 43% of the Medicaid population, followed by adults ages 35-64 at 29% and people ages 20-34 at 22%.

The profile is a little different for the more than 650,000 Virginians who joined the program under new eligibility standards that came into effect. January 1, 2019, to expand Medicaid under “Obamacare” to include childless adults for the first time. About 45% of these beneficiaries are between 19 and 34 years old and 37% between 35 and 54 years old.

The overwhelming majority of people in the expanding population – more than 485,000 – earn less than the federal poverty level, which is $12,140 one year for a single person and $20,780 for a family of three. About 169,000 earned between 100% and 138% of the poverty line, or up to $16,775 for a single person and $28,676 for a family of three.

Where do they live? More than 511,000 Medicaid beneficiaries live in the state Central region: of which about 85,000 in richmondnearly 81,000 each in Henrico and Chesterfield counties, and nearly 16,000 in County of Hanover.

The largest number of beneficiaries live in from Virginia most populated locality Fairfax Countywith more than 165,000, followed by Prince William County with nearly 103,000.

Medicaid is an expensive program, over $19 billion per year, divided between the federal government and the state governments. They’ve split the cost roughly 50-50 for the base Medicaid population, but the feds are paying 90% of the cost for those enrolled under the expansion, with a provider tax on hospitals covering the part of the State within the framework of the budgetary agreement on General assembly adopted in 2018.

Nearly 49% of the cost covers the elderly, disabled, and pregnant women, who make up just 18% of the Medicaid population.

So why Virginia do you need to redetermine the eligibility of the 2 million people enrolled in the program?

After the start of the pandemic in March 2020, Congress passed the Families First Coronavirus Relief Act, the first in a series of emergency funding bills that provided a higher federal matching share to pay for state Medicaid programs. In Virginiait was 6.2% more, more than $1 billion until September.

In return, the state couldn’t kick people off the Medicaid rolls, even if they no longer met the eligibility requirements. Once the federal government ends the public health emergency, states must begin re-determining eligibility, and as soon as 1st of Augustthey can remove people from the program.

the US Department of Health and Human Services is expected to decide by Monday whether to end the public health emergency or extend it for another quarter of the fiscal year, until September. The government has promised to give states at least 60 days notice before ending the emergency.

Once Virginia begins to unwind the program by redetermining eligibility, the state and its partners will look for ways to ensure people continue to have health care coverage.

“Our fear is that there will be eligible people falling through the cracks,” said Debbie Oswaltgeneral manager of the Virginia Health Care Foundationwhich works to expand health coverage and reduce the number of uninsured Virginians.

Many will reapply for Medicaid coverage if they remain eligible. Some will be covered by federally subsidized market-based insurance premiums that the federal government currently runs – the state will take over in early 2024. Others who have secured employment will obtain private insurance through the intermediary of their employer. And some will become eligible for Medicare when they turn 65.

Virginia Poverty Law Center will be in the midst of these efforts to find health care coverage for people who may no longer qualify for Medicaid. The center, based in richmond, employs 23 “navigators” across the state in the Virginia ENROLL! program, which helps guide people through the process of finding affordable health insurance.

“We expect a lot of work to help people find their place,” said Sara CarianoPolicy Specialist and Senior Health Insurance Navigator at the Legal Center.

The six managed care companies that provide health care coverage through Medicaid in Virginia also plan to help people find affordable insurance.

“This is a special initiative where we want to maintain continuity of care for people,” Gray told the health plans association.

[email protected](804) 649-6964

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United Arts Appeal Grant recipients announced for 2022 | News, Sports, Jobs http://www.maticezasovska.cz/united-arts-appeal-grant-recipients-announced-for-2022-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 14 May 2022 05:39:13 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/united-arts-appeal-grant-recipients-announced-for-2022-news-sports-jobs/ Three local organizations and two individual artists received grants from the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County (UAA) Project Pool Grant Program. The winners of the 2022 United Arts Appeal Project Pool Grant Program are: ORGANIZATIONS Audubon Community Nature Center: Mud Art Citizens for a Better Cassadaga: Cassadaga Lakes Summer 2022 Concert Series […]]]>

Three local organizations and two individual artists received grants from the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County (UAA) Project Pool Grant Program.

The winners of the 2022 United Arts Appeal Project Pool Grant Program are:

ORGANIZATIONS

Audubon Community Nature Center: Mud Art

Citizens for a Better Cassadaga: Cassadaga Lakes Summer 2022 Concert Series

Falconer Public Library: Seas of Possibility with Music

INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS

Jenny Brown: Fibers

Jill Reese: Summer of Ukulele: Community Jam Sessions

In addition to providing operational support to six of the county’s largest arts organizations, the UAA awards these annual awards for artistic projects. To apply, organizations must have non-profit status; individuals must reside in Chautauqua County for at least one year and may work in any artistic discipline.

After being reviewed for eligibility and meeting requirements, applications are reviewed by an advisory committee made up of artists and community leaders. Their recommendations are then reviewed for approval by the United Arts Appeals Committee.

Member organizations of the United Arts Appeal are the Chautauqua Regional Youth Ballet, Community Music Project, 1891 Fredonia Opera House Performing Arts Center, Infinity Visual and Performing Arts, Lucille Ball Little Theater in Jamestown, and Western New York Chamber Orchestra.

The United Arts Appeal is supported by Chautauqua County, local foundations, corporations, businesses and individuals throughout the county. For more information about UAA, including programs offered by member organizations, visit UnitedArtsAppeal.org.

Contributions to support the United Arts Appeal of Chautauqua County may be made by check payable to United Arts Appeal and mailed to PO Box 754, Jamestown, NY 14702.



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Bishop Maginn students help choose scholarship recipients http://www.maticezasovska.cz/bishop-maginn-students-help-choose-scholarship-recipients/ Thu, 12 May 2022 13:03:23 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/bishop-maginn-students-help-choose-scholarship-recipients/ ALBANY — The Bishop Maginn High School Youth Philanthropy Council says grant applications are being accepted for nonprofit organizations in Albany County. Applicants can request up to $2,500 for projects focused on health, arts, poverty alleviation and education. A grant of just under $7,500 from the Diocese of Albany Higher Learning Program was used to […]]]>

ALBANY — The Bishop Maginn High School Youth Philanthropy Council says grant applications are being accepted for nonprofit organizations in Albany County. Applicants can request up to $2,500 for projects focused on health, arts, poverty alleviation and education.

A grant of just under $7,500 from the Diocese of Albany Higher Learning Program was used to establish the council for this school year alone.

The BMHS Youth Philanthropy Council (YPC) is a student-led program that offers students the opportunity to become leaders in their community by learning about community needs, real-world issues, and philanthropy. Four students in the program will decide which applicants will receive the scholarships.

“The Bishop Maginn Youth Philanthropy Council is a great way to teach students about philanthropy, while empowering them to use their voice to make a difference,” said program facilitator Rebecca Bliss.

Being student-led means that students become members of the council and become familiar with the grant process in order to review applications. After applying to join the board in October, members were off to a flying start after their Christmas break.

“Students spent several weeks learning about different types of nonprofits and the grantmaking process,” Bliss said. “They’re excited to put what they’ve learned to good use by giving at least one nonprofit the opportunity to complete a project that will impact Albany County.”

The deadline to apply for a grant is May 23. Board members will review the nominations and choose the winning nonprofits. The funds will be awarded on June 27.

Anyone interested in applying for the YPC grant can visit Bishopmaginn.org and download the grant application. For more information, email rbliss@bishopmaginn.org.

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Peoria’s Soulside Yoga Studio Trains Fellows http://www.maticezasovska.cz/peorias-soulside-yoga-studio-trains-fellows/ Tue, 10 May 2022 22:10:46 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/peorias-soulside-yoga-studio-trains-fellows/ This is the sixth in a series of blogs celebrating grant projects funded by our Clean Air Act settlement with the owners of the ED Edwards coal-fired power plant outside Peoria, Illinois. The settlement calls for the plant to be closed by the end of 2022 and makes $8.6 million available for local projects in […]]]>

This is the sixth in a series of blogs celebrating grant projects funded by our Clean Air Act settlement with the owners of the ED Edwards coal-fired power plant outside Peoria, Illinois. The settlement calls for the plant to be closed by the end of 2022 and makes $8.6 million available for local projects in job training, lung health, energy efficiency, solar power and energy. bus electrification. Each blog features the great work done by one of the facility’s grantees to promote public health and quality of life in the Peoria, Illinois area.

Soulside Healing Arts in Peoria, Illinois, a nonprofit, trauma-informed yoga studio with a pay-as-you-go structure, is currently training two new yoga instructors, April Foster and Taylor Hudson, with the help of with a grant from the Edwards Settlement Fund. The studio’s executive director, Hannah Ramlo, founded the nonprofit in 2018 with the goal of sharing yoga, a fundamental practice for her for managing stress, with the people of Peoria.

One of Soulside’s fellows, April Foster, talks about the lack of representation she has experienced in yoga.

Soulside Healing Arts Instagram.

Taylor Hudson, one of the Soulside Fellows, reflects on some of the benefits of yoga.

Soulside Healing Arts Instagram.

The studio applied for an Edwards grant with the aim of sharing the health benefits of yoga with a wider population than Soulside had been able to reach until now. Through its Community Yoga Corps program, Soulside partners with social service agencies and local schools to supplement programming with regular yoga classes. Yoga can help improve lung function, regulate the nervous system, and alleviate anxiety, addiction, and depression associated with trauma such as poverty, job loss, or chronic health conditions.

Yoga is an integral part of Hannah, April and Taylor’s life. Hannah describes yoga as a practice that allowed her to experience the world from a centered place and maintain her presence in every moment. For April, a mother of five, grandmother of three and longtime community member, it helps her slow down and put things into perspective. Taylor, a plant lover and part-time student, appreciates that the benefits of yoga are both internal and external, allowing her to be in tune with herself. The three women note that the impact of yoga extends to all areas of their lives, changing the way they react and improving their relationships.

Unfortunately, the benefits of yoga are not widely available. April and Hannah observed two main and interrelated barriers: cost and the underrepresentation of people of color. Yoga studios are often only accessible to people with disposable income, and the average cost of classes in the Peoria area is $15. For many people, especially in low-income areas of Peoria, this cost is a barrier to regular attendance. Soulside’s subsidized and flexible payment structure aims to ease the cost barrier by offering a range of price options, from $2 to $50 for a class.

An interior view of Soulside’s studio.

In the global west, yoga is often associated with white women. April observes that there isn’t much representation of BIPOC people doing or teaching yoga and asks, without representation, why would people of color attend yoga classes? Hannah indicates that there is a preconceived idea about who should go to yoga. Soulside aims to ensure that their yoga instructors are like the students they teach, and the scholarship program is aimed at that goal. The benefits of yoga extend beyond any demographic, and Soulside hopes to reach as many Peorans as possible and reflect the city’s demographics in their classes.

We can’t wait to see how Taylor and April use their instructions to engage with the community. Taylor aims to reach people who never knew they needed yoga and guide them to better health and body awareness. April, who has extensive experience working in the community, hopes to combine this with her training as a yoga instructor to work with children and the elderly to support their mental health.

Other Edwards Institution-funded projects include a solar panel at Peoria Roman Arts and Culture Community Center; the expansion of an employment assistance program operated by Peoria’s Jubilee Ministries; the electric buses that two Peoria-area school districts have added to their fleets; an increased allowance for the PeoriaCorps Green Infrastructure Training Program; and the launch of a new all-electric bus for the Peoria Transit District. The NRDC and its co-applicants selected the projects with the help of their community partners Central Illinois Healthy Community Alliance, Illinois People’s Action and Peoria NAACP. For a complete list of projects, visit EdwardsCleanAirSettlement.org.

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Design students receive scholarships and awards at the 2022 Fay Jones School Awards Ceremony http://www.maticezasovska.cz/design-students-receive-scholarships-and-awards-at-the-2022-fay-jones-school-awards-ceremony/ Mon, 09 May 2022 05:09:36 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/design-students-receive-scholarships-and-awards-at-the-2022-fay-jones-school-awards-ceremony/ Whit Pruitt Dean Peter MacKeith, along with Ken and Liz Allen, stand alongside some of the 15 student recipients of the Ken and Liz Allen Award in Design, a new award this year as part of the Honors and Awards Recognition Program of Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design. The Fay […]]]>



Whit Pruitt

Dean Peter MacKeith, along with Ken and Liz Allen, stand alongside some of the 15 student recipients of the Ken and Liz Allen Award in Design, a new award this year as part of the Honors and Awards Recognition Program of Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design.

The Fay Jones School of Architecture and Design recently announced that nearly 90 students will receive scholarships and other awards through its 2022 Honors and Awards Recognition Program. This year, more than $270,000 – a 50% increase in monetary awards compared to 2021 – were awarded in the form of scholarships recognizing various aspects of student achievement in architecture, landscape architecture and interior design. The school held an honors reception and recognition ceremony on April 22 at Vol Walker Hall to celebrate these honorees.

“The Fay Jones School is committed to making its design degree programs both affordable and accessible,” said Peter MacKeith, Dean of the School, “and the ever-growing scholarship funds put available to our students are a testament to this ongoing effort. Our students are talented, hardworking and dedicated, and the generosity of our many donors and benefactors allows us to recognize this excellence in greater numbers. Congratulations to all of our scholarship and award-winning students, and a special thank you to our many donors and friends.

Many honors were bestowed in each of the three departments, while some honors were available to any student in the school. Some students have received multiple awards.

Students selected from across the school for recognition included:

  • Benjamin Ebbesmeyer and Matthew Wilson, both architecture and Honors College students, who were named Senior Scholars. This designation is for seniors who have graduated from the school with the highest grade point average.
  • Jared Davenport, an architecture and Honors College student who was awarded the U of A Presidential Scholarship. This is awarded to the student with a high academic record in the school.
  • Grace Shoemaker (architecture), Julie DePetris (interior design) and Kara Simmons (landscape architecture), who received the Pryor Award for Leadership in Architecture and Design. This award is given to rising sophomores who demonstrate superior leadership commitment, thoughtfulness, and vision in school and university, in honor of Senator David Pryor of Arkansas.
  • Kayla Ho, architecture and Honors College student who received the Alpha Rho Chi Medal. This award is given to a graduating student who has demonstrated leadership, rendered voluntary service to the school, and demonstrated a promise of professional merit through attitude and personality.
  • Interior Design and Honors College student Isabel Provisor Lemery and Architecture student Kaden Catalano, both of whom received the HFA Designing with Technology scholarship. This award is given to progressing third, fourth or fifth year students who demonstrate the use and integration of technology in architectural and interior design through the use of illustration, planning and design. .
  • Lillyan Priest, landscape architecture student who received the Michael J. Buono Medal for Sustainability. This award is given to graduating students who have demonstrated the utmost concern in design studios, related courses, and the community for environmental, ecological, and energy conservation issues.
  • Riku Suzuki (interior design), Noah Berg (architecture) and Rebekah Crowley (landscape architecture), who received grants from the Professional Advisory Board. These are awarded to graduating students who demonstrate hard work, perseverance, dedication and potential for success in the profession. Berg is also a student at Honors College.
  • Enelyn Hernandez, an architecture student who received the Robert B. Norcross Endowed Scholarship in Design Excellence, a new award this year. This award is given to an architecture or interior design student in their second, third, fourth, or fifth year, with preference given to first-generation students from Arkansas or Tennessee.
  • Hunter Waters, a landscape architecture student who received the Peter L. Schaudt Memorial Fellowship for Collaborative Design, a new award this year. It is awarded to a student of architecture or landscape architecture entering fourth or fifth year.
  • Eugenio Mendoza, an interior design student who received the Andrew A. Kinslow and Russell W. Kirkpatrick Diversity Award for Design Excellence, a new award this year. This award is given to a second, third, fourth or fifth year student who demonstrates a commitment to diversity and inclusion.
  • Ann-Wesley Banks (Interior Design), Eva Bwiza (Architecture), Chad Chamberlain (Landscape Architecture), Emily Chastain (Interior Design), Jason Cote (Interior Design), Rebekah Crowley (Landscape Architecture) , Raquel Gamboa (Architecture), Sofia Hickey (Interior Design), Medy Kepnga (Architecture), Matthew King (Landscape Architecture and Honors College), Jesse Light (Landscape Architecture), Maria Longo (Architecture), Jennifer Martinez ( architecture), Eugenio Mendoza (interior design) and Fiorella Sibaja (landscape architecture), which received the Ken and Liz Allen Award in Design, a new award this year. This is awarded to students with demonstrated need.

Notable recognition for architecture students included:

  • Benjamin Ebbesmeyer, also an Honors College student, who received the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Medal for Academic Excellence. This award is given to the first-placed graduating student of architecture in recognition of academic achievement, character, leadership, and promise of high professional ability.
  • Matthew Wilson, also a student at Honors College, who received the Edward Durell Stone Medal. This award is given to the final year architecture student with the highest cumulative grade point average in design studio work.
  • Hannah Gray, also an Honors College student, who received the Barbara C. Crook Medal. This award is given to the graduating student who has achieved the highest course record in the Architectural Technology group.
  • Gabriel De Souza Silva, also an Honors College student, who received the C. Murray Smart Medal. This award is given to the final year architecture student with the best academic record in the study of architectural history and theory.
  • Nate Cole, also a student at Honors College, who received the Cyrus Sutherland Historic Preservation Alliance Scholarship. This award is given to a student who has demonstrated an interest in historic preservation.
  • Alexander White, also a student at Honors College, who received the Magar Family Award in Design, a new award this year. This award is given to a third-, fourth-, or fifth-year architecture student, with preference given to non-traditional students.

Notable recognition for landscape architecture students included:

  • Winifred Vanlandingham, who received the Verna C. Garvan Medal. This award is given to the senior landscape architecture student who, through their performance in the studio sequence, has demonstrated outstanding design ability.
  • Rebekah Crowley, who received the Judy Byrd Brittenum Cultural Landscape Award. This award is given to the student who demonstrates an interest in the study of cultural landscapes, including cultural sustainability, historic preservation, history and/or documentation of cultural landscapes.
  • Emily Booth, who received the Phillips Family Scholarship. This is awarded to a well-rounded student in the applications of landscape architecture.

Notable recognition for interior design students included:

  • Megan Paul, also a student at Honors College, who received the Interior Design Excellence Medal. This award is given to the top final year interior design student in recognition of their academic achievement.
  • Madison Shell, who received the Andrew A. Kinslow Interior Design Fellowship. This award is given to a third- or fourth-year interior design student from Arkansas who has an interest in commercial design and has a high grade point average.
  • Ally Lemons, Lacey Oxford and Isabel Provisor Lemery, who received the Interior Design Foundation Fellowship. This award is given to students who demonstrate academic achievement and show promise in the discipline. Oxford and Provisor Lemery are also Honors College students.
  • Angelica Williams, who received the William Stephen Lair Design Fellowship. This award is given to a second, third or fourth year student who demonstrates high academic standards and demonstrates academic promise.

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Advocacy Award Winners Honored by Jackson’s Center for Family Health http://www.maticezasovska.cz/advocacy-award-winners-honored-by-jacksons-center-for-family-health/ Sat, 07 May 2022 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/advocacy-award-winners-honored-by-jacksons-center-for-family-health/ JACKSON, MI — Six individuals and one organization have been honored at the Center for Family Health’s eighth annual Advocacy Awards. The Thursday, May 5 event at Cascades Manor House in Jackson honored community leaders, dedicated citizens and CFH staff who demonstrate an exceptional commitment to health care advocacy and social justice. “This is an […]]]>

JACKSON, MI — Six individuals and one organization have been honored at the Center for Family Health’s eighth annual Advocacy Awards.

The Thursday, May 5 event at Cascades Manor House in Jackson honored community leaders, dedicated citizens and CFH staff who demonstrate an exceptional commitment to health care advocacy and social justice.

“This is an annual event that we look forward to,” said Terry Langston, Director of Communications and Advocacy. “We appreciate the work community members and our staff are doing to help make health care more accessible. This year’s recognized individuals are doing just that,” said Terry Langston, CFH Director of Communications and Advocacy.

This year’s winners include:

Denny Litosformerly a member of the Michigan Primary Care Association, which receives the Georgia Fojtasek Health Advocacy Award in honor of his advocacy efforts to protect Medicaid, the 340B Pharmacy Program, and Michigan Community Health Centers.

The First United Methodist Church Wellness Teamwho receives the Corporate or Organizational Health Advocacy Award for her child health efforts in the Jackson community, including the Back-to-School program.

Hillary Bennetaccount executive at Print-Tech, who receives the CFH Ambassador award for her many hours of volunteerism and support.

Brad Floryformer MLive/Jackson Citizen Patriot reporter, who receives the Champion of Social Justice and Health Advocacy Award for his involvement in community service through nonprofit work and reporting on significant health issues.

Erin’s Tombdirector of CFH’s dental/cross-border practice, who receives the health promotion award for her work in honoring the center’s mission of “opening the doors to health care for all”.

Mike LittleJohna CFH Certified Physician Assistant, who receives the Exemplary Customer Service Award for his care in helping all patients feel welcome, comfortable and safe.

Dr. Navira Rizwana CFH family physician, who receives the Exemplary Service Award for his instrumental role in improving the health of patients at the center with chronic conditions such as diabetes and hypertension.

“We are delighted to recognize all of the winners.” Sara Benedetto, interim CEO/COO of CFH, said in a statement. “Their contributions have a positive impact on the patients we serve and our community as a whole. We congratulate and applaud them for all they do to make a difference.

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