Public Community – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ Mon, 23 May 2022 17:56:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png Public Community – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ 32 32 An expert explains | ASHA: A successful experience in public health rooted in the village community http://www.maticezasovska.cz/an-expert-explains-asha-a-successful-experience-in-public-health-rooted-in-the-village-community/ Mon, 23 May 2022 16:35:18 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/an-expert-explains-asha-a-successful-experience-in-public-health-rooted-in-the-village-community/ The World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized the contribution of India’s One Million Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA) during the Covid-19 pandemic. ASHAs are recognized as facilitating linkages of households to health facilities and playing a central role in door-to-door surveys, immunization, public health, and reproductive and child health measures. In many states, ASHAs are […]]]>

The World Health Organization (WHO) has recognized the contribution of India’s One Million Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA) during the Covid-19 pandemic. ASHAs are recognized as facilitating linkages of households to health facilities and playing a central role in door-to-door surveys, immunization, public health, and reproductive and child health measures.

In many states, ASHAs are involved in national health programs and in the response to a range of communicable and non-communicable diseases. They receive performance-based payments, not a fixed salary like civil servants. There have been agitations demanding employee status for ASHA workers. The idea of ​​performance-based payments was never to pay them a pittance – the compensation had to be substantial.

Genesis and evolution

The ASHA program was based on Chhattisgarh’s successful Mitanin program, in which one community worker serves 50 households. The ASHA was to be a local resident, caring for 200 households. The program had a very strong emphasis on step-by-step capacity building in selected areas of public health. Dr. T Sundararaman and Dr. Rajani Ved, among others, provided significant support to this process. Many states have tried to gradually develop the ASHA from a community worker to a community health worker, and even to an auxiliary nurse midwife (ANM)/general nurse and midwife (GNM), or a nurse of public health.

Important public policy and public management lessons emerge from the successful experience with community workers who were not the bottom rung of the government system – rather they belonged to the community and were paid for the services they rendered. The idea was to make her a part of the village community rather than a government employee.

More than 98% of ASHAs belong to the village where they reside and know each household. Their selection involved the community and key resource persons. Educational qualification was a consideration. With her newly acquired skills in health care and the ability to connect households to health facilities, she was able to secure benefits for households. She was like a civil servant on the demand side, reaching patients in facilities, delivering health services closer to home.

Building a frame

It is a program that has worked well across the country. As skills improved, recognition and respect for ASHA grew. In a way, it became a program that enabled a local woman to become a qualified health professional.
The ASHAs faced a series of challenges: Where to stay in a hospital? How to manage mobility? How to resolve security issues? The solutions were found in a partnership between frontline workers, panchayat officials and community workers. This process, along with the strengthening of public health infrastructure with flexible funding and innovations under Mission Santé and Health and Wellness Centers, has led to an increase in attendance at public facilities. Accountability has increased; there would be protests if an establishment did not offer quality services.

The community worker added value to this process. Incentives for institutional deliveries and the establishment of emergency ambulance services such as 108, 102, etc. in most states have put pressure on public institutions and improved the mobility of ASHAs. Overall, this created a new cadre of progressively skilled local workers who were paid according to their performance. ASHAs were respected for bringing basic health services to the doorstep of households.

Compensation issue

There have been challenges with respect to performance-based compensation. In many states, payment is low and often delayed. The original idea was never to deny ASHA compensation that might be even better than a salary – it was only to prevent “governmentalization” and promote “communitarianization” by making it accountable to the people. that she served.

There were serious debates within the mission steering group, and the late Raghuvansh Prasad Singh made a very passionate plea for fixed fees to ASHAs. Dr. Abhay Bang and others wanted the community character to remain and made an equally strong plea for developing the skills and capacities of community workers. Some states have encouraged ASHAs to move up the human resources/skills ladder by becoming ANMs/GNMs and even nurses after preferential admission to these courses.

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Important public policy lessons are the need to progressively develop a local worker accountable to the community, to make performance-based payments, and to provide a push on the demand side with a simultaneous increase services in public systems. The system can only sustain and grow if compensation is adequate, and ASHA continues to enjoy the trust of the community.

Status debate

There is a strong case for granting tenure to some of these positions with reasonable pay as a supporting motivation. The progressive development of a local resident is an important factor in the engagement of human resources in community-related sectors. This should also apply to other field staff such as ANMs, GNMs, public health nurses.

Equally important is ensuring that performance pay is timely and adequate. Ideally, an ASHA should be able to earn more than the salary of a government employee, with opportunities to move up the ranks in the formal primary health care system as an ANM/GNM or public health nurse. Upgrading skills and providing easy access to credit and finance will ensure a sustainable opportunity to earn a respectable living while serving the community. Strengthening access to health insurance, credit for consumption and subsistence needs at reasonable rates, and coverage under pro-poor social safety net programs will help make ASHAs agents of even more powerful change.

Amarjeet Sinha is a retired civil servant who has been associated with the design and capacity building of the ASHA program for over five years.

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City Life Org – High Line Network launches Community First Toolkit, a guide to increasing equity in public spaces http://www.maticezasovska.cz/city-life-org-high-line-network-launches-community-first-toolkit-a-guide-to-increasing-equity-in-public-spaces/ Sat, 21 May 2022 18:12:36 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/city-life-org-high-line-network-launches-community-first-toolkit-a-guide-to-increasing-equity-in-public-spaces/ Developed with the Urban Institute and Harvard School of Design, the toolkit addresses inequalities caused by infrastructural racism The High Line Network, a High Line program that supports a group of nonprofits transforming underutilized infrastructure into new urban landscapes, announces the launch of its Community First Toolkit. Developed by the High Line Network in partnership […]]]>

Developed with the Urban Institute and Harvard School of Design, the toolkit addresses inequalities caused by infrastructural racism

The High Line Network, a High Line program that supports a group of nonprofits transforming underutilized infrastructure into new urban landscapes, announces the launch of its Community First Toolkit. Developed by the High Line Network in partnership with the Harvard Graduate School of Design and the Urban Institute, the Community First Toolkit is an equity-based action planning resource for practitioners in the field of infrastructure reuse, as well as municipal officials, city planners, leaders of non-profit organizations and other members of the community.

Infrastructure development has been a key means by which inequality has become embedded in the landscape. The building of highways that passed through predominantly black, low-income communities, redlining policies that determined who could and could not own property in certain areas, and other forms of unequal investment in different neighborhoods had lasting and disproportionate economic, health and health effects. environmental impacts across racial and income lines.

The Community First Toolkit aims to address inequities caused by historical and enduring infrastructural racism by prioritizing community in park design, budgeting, and all phases of planning. Fifteen Network members worked with research partners over two years to develop a new process and a set of practitioner-focused tools to do this work. The resulting Community First Toolkit is designed to help park organizations address inequalities caused by infrastructural racism and shape public spaces that bring social, environmental and economic benefits to communities.

Using 18 digital tools, the toolkit provides a structured process to understand the influence and impact of infrastructure reuse in their community and develop equity-based action plans. The process includes the following steps:

● Examine the history of a community: identify its demographics, organizations, institutions; mapping equity challenges and assets; establish historical timelines with key milestones with community members; combine and examine these takeaways to understand the impact of infrastructure and past policy.
● Focus equity: shaping a vision for equitable impact; describe the actions to be taken to achieve this impact; review ongoing initiatives to see what efforts are needed.
● Prepare internally: review internal governance for equitable decision-making; monitor the extent to which budgets are fairly allocated; share power and governance with community members; publicly communicate the goals.
● Build partnerships: determine if collaborators are aligned; identify gaps in the partnership; assess community engagement; maximize where the most impact can be made in and out of the organization.
● Ensure progress: establish a blueprint for the organization; track progress metrics; share the impact story with the public and funders

In addition, the toolkit is accompanied by stories of experiences from network members, showing how the toolkit can and has been used to address real-world park organization challenges.

“What we hope the Community First Toolkit will do is show all park organizations, regardless of size or stage of development, that the right time to start centering the community in your work is now” , said Asima Jansveld, chief executive of the High Line. Network. “It doesn’t matter if you’re still in design or fully operational, everyone has a starting point for making our cities more equitable and inclusive. We hope this toolkit will become the standard for creators, funders and partners of public spaces in holding themselves accountable to the people they serve.”

“Members of the High Line network and others reimagining existing infrastructure as inclusive public spaces must invariably grapple with the legacy of historical and contemporary racism that affects these places,” said Peter Tatian, Principal Investigator. at the Metropolitan Housing and Communities Policy Center of the Urban Institute. “To ensure that public spaces are welcoming to all, the Community First Toolkit helps people address equitable development challenges in all of their work: from planning to monitoring and implementation. some progress.”

“Race is treated more as an area of ​​specialization than the endemic cornerstone of society and space that it is,” said Stephen Gray, associate professor of urban design at Harvard University, Graduate School of Design. ”The Community First Toolkit is designed to help cities and civil society organizations contextualize their projects within the legacies of racialized policies and practices illuminating the complicated relationship between systemic racism and the production of space and equip them to tackle barriers to community resilience.

The toolkit is available online at: https://toolkit.highlinenetwork.org. An introductory booklet (available digitally as a PDF) accompanies the toolkit, serving as an overview and including historical context around infrastructural racism, as well as definitions, purposes and stories around the processes of network to create equitable impact. Nineteen case studies from network members across the United States are included to illustrate the use of the tools and the results they have produced.

On May 18, 2022, at 2:30 p.m. EDT, the Urban Institute hosted a virtual launch event for the toolkit. Speakers from the Urban Institute, Harvard Graduate School of Design, and network members explored the tools and processes they developed, along with their key findings. They discussed their experiences, reflecting on the lessons they learned while measuring the impact they are creating.

ABOUT THE HIGH LINE NETWORK

Brought to you by the High Line, The High Line Network is a group of infrastructure reuse projects and the people who help bring it to life. As cities become denser and land for traditional parks becomes scarce, residents are finding creative ways to bring green spaces to their neighborhoods. High Line network projects transform underutilized infrastructure into new urban landscapes. Redefining what a park can be, these hybrid spaces are also public squares, open-air museums, botanical gardens, social service organizations, footbridges, transit corridors, and more.

For more information about the High Line network, please visit network.thehighline.org.

ABOUT THE URBAN INSTITUTE

The Urban Institute is a nonprofit research organization that provides data and evidence to help advance upward mobility and equity. We are a trusted source for changemakers looking to strengthen decision-making, create inclusive economic growth, and improve the well-being of families and communities. For over 50 years, Urban has provided facts that inspire solutions and that remains our responsibility today.

ABOUT THE HARVARD GRADUATE SCHOOL OF DESIGN AND CODESIGN

CoDesign at the Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) seeks to strengthen the connections between teaching, research, practice, and activism. It draws on GSD’s design studio and research tradition, spans different programs, and involves students, fellows, alumni, and faculty to match appetite and resources for applied projects within the GSD with collaborative opportunities from nonprofits, community groups, civic organizations, and government agencies in Greater Boston and beyond. In line with our Community Values ​​Statement and the Dean’s Office for Diversity, CoDesign aims to enhance the community relevance and impact of planning and design education and training at GSD, as well as to deepen experiences teaching and learning. The development of the Community First Toolkit involved graduate researchers enrolled in the “Urban Design and the Color-Line” seminar/workshop and paired with organizations in the High Line network to unpack and expand their racial equity programs.

SUPPORT

The High Line network is made possible by the founding support of the JPB Foundation. Other major support provided by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

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‘Con Confianza y En Comunidad’ celebrates two years of community support – PUBLIC HEALTH INSIDER http://www.maticezasovska.cz/con-confianza-y-en-comunidad-celebrates-two-years-of-community-support-public-health-insider/ Fri, 20 May 2022 01:20:18 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/con-confianza-y-en-comunidad-celebrates-two-years-of-community-support-public-health-insider/ This week marks the second anniversary of an initiative created to support the Spanish-speaking community during the historically difficult time of the pandemic. “A unique space, by Latinos, for Latinos and in our language,” according to Dr. Matias Valenzuela, director of the Office of Equity and Community Partnerships at Public Health – Seattle & King […]]]>

This week marks the second anniversary of an initiative created to support the Spanish-speaking community during the historically difficult time of the pandemic.

“A unique space, by Latinos, for Latinos and in our language,” according to Dr. Matias Valenzuela, director of the Office of Equity and Community Partnerships at Public Health – Seattle & King County.

This space is “Con Confianza y en Comunidad: Hablando sobre COVID-19 y temas que nos afectan” (In confidence and in community: Talking about COVID-19 and the issues that affect us), a series created at the beginning of the pandemic through a collaboration between community and public health – Seattle and King County. Here, members of the Latinx community come together to share updates and resources related to COVID-19 and other health and wellness topics.

“Con Confianza” began as a response to the lack of information available in Spanish, but quickly became a safe space where the public can interact directly with community leaders and public health personnel who speak their language, know their culture and understand the challenges facing the Latin American community.

A second year full of challenges

“In the first year of the pandemic, we quickly realized that the Latin American community was one of the hardest hit in terms of cases and other issues such as economic insecurity,” Dr. Valenzuela said. . Additionally, “many of us were essential workers.”

Meanwhile, the Latin American community has not been able to count on the same level of support – “because, for example, as immigrants, not everyone had access to benefits such as unemployment “, said Valenzuela.

In the second year of the pandemic, while some areas of support improved, economic issues continued to be a concern for many in the community. Even though there was initially a moratorium on evictions, many people were still very stressed about having to pay rent, being unemployed or having to leave work to care for children.

Con Confianza team members supported the community by providing information on resources available from King County and other organizations, including mask distribution, isolation and quarantine assistance , leasing assistance and business resources.

As our community faced these obstacles, new challenges arose all the time. The arrival of COVID-19 vaccines was a great relief for many, but many obstacles existed to getting vaccinated. The public was also grappling with questions, doubts and misinformation amplified by social media.

“We continued to experience similar things to the first year – fear, not knowing what was going to happen and misinformation,” said Con Confianza organizing team member Gabriela López.

A zoom meeting with nine members of the Con Confianza organizing team waving and smiling at the camera.
Members of the organizing team of Con Confianza in 2020.

Fight against misinformation

One of the most challenging aspects of this second year of the pandemic has been how quickly information has changed: about the vaccine, mask mandates, guidelines for schools, home testing, and much more. . Sometimes the information seemed to change from day to day.

“We were all learning almost at the same time as new information was coming out and we all had the same questions,” López said. It was therefore sometimes difficult to provide up-to-date information to the community without generating confusion.

“Every time there was a new development, we entered a phase of trying to provide information again. People were afraid, had doubts or simply did not know what was going on. Every time another step was taken, we were facing the same public health challenge: people did not know what to believe and what not to believe,” López said.

“Are vaccines safe and effective? Will they ask for supporting documents? I’ve already contracted COVID, so why should I worry? said Valenzuela, listing some frequently asked questions.

“The level of misinformation has been very high,” he acknowledged.

Con Confianza stuck to its original strategy of working with community leaders and authorities the public could trust. Among the many guests who made appearances at the weekly meetings, Dr. Julián Pérez of the Sea Mar Community Health Center and Dr. Helen Stankiewicz of the University of Washington became indispensable members of the team, attending dozens of times to answer questions from community members.

“It helped a lot when someone with knowledge, with a good reputation, who was a medical authority, like Dr. Helen for example, spoke up,” López said.

She gave an example: “We had a meeting with many doctors present where they discussed what was in the vaccines. I remember that I sent this video to many WhatsApp groups, including a group in which there were people who did not want to be vaccinated. And the majority of people in that group said to me, ‘Yeah, that was great, it’s great that you sent it to us!’ »

The use of various platforms also made it possible to disseminate this information to more people and broaden the reach of the group. If a community member can’t join the Zoom meeting, for example, they can watch the live video on Facebook or view the recording later both there and on YouTube.

“There are videos that have up to 900 views on YouTube on a day when there were maybe 30 people on Zoom,” López said.

Around the third year

What will next year bring? One thing the Con Confianza team agrees on is the importance of mental health to the community.

“The subject of mental health is something that continues to be not only interesting, but also very concerning,” said Giselle Zapata-García, COVID-19 Latinx Community Response Coordinator.

Two years of wearing face masks, being cooped up at home, not having in-person classes, all coupled with high stress levels has caused mental exhaustion for many.

“There is a feeling of fatigue in the community, real fatigue,” López explained. “And not just for the Latino community – for everyone.”

Con Confianza has hosted several presentations on mental health issues over the past year that have generated a lot of interest from the public. This will continue to be a priority in the coming year.

Still, with or without the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s clear that this group’s work won’t be done anytime soon.

“As long as there are infections, as long as there are hospitalizations, as long as not everyone is vaccinated or has not received their booster, there is always a place for Con Confianza to continue to to be a place of trust for people. to receive information,” López said.

“We must do everything we can to support Con Confianza y En Comunidad so that it can continue at some level, even if the pandemic is over,” added Zapata-García.

“We have seen that the community feels that this way they can come together and share their concerns, and it helps us to see how we can better support the community. It allows us to have the long-term trust of the community,” she said.

“We had an open forum, with different voices, and we answered all kinds of questions,” Valenzuela said.

“Now our community has the information it needs to make decisions. We still have work to do, but we should be proud of what we have achieved.

Join us!

We would like to thank all of the guests who have joined us over the past two years and generously given their time, as well as the members of the community who continue to attend and ask questions.

If you want to participate in Con Confianza y En Comunidad, join us every first and third Tuesday of the month at 5 p.m. on Zoom or on Facebook Live on @CondadoDeKing!

If you have ideas for other topics or guests, email us at phpartnerships@kingcounty.gov. Your suggestions are welcome.

Originally published May 19, 2022.

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Community mobility committee urges repair of dangerous streets in St. Louis http://www.maticezasovska.cz/community-mobility-committee-urges-repair-of-dangerous-streets-in-st-louis/ Tue, 17 May 2022 21:30:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/community-mobility-committee-urges-repair-of-dangerous-streets-in-st-louis/ Sections of St. Louis’ busiest streets have long been dug out with potholes the size of lobster traps. Yet with millions of US bailout dollars now to be deployed for repaving projects, the city’s citizen-led Community Mobility Committee has an unexpected request for the mayor: Slow down. It’s not that the committee is anti-car or […]]]>

Sections of St. Louis’ busiest streets have long been dug out with potholes the size of lobster traps. Yet with millions of US bailout dollars now to be deployed for repaving projects, the city’s citizen-led Community Mobility Committee has an unexpected request for the mayor: Slow down.

It’s not that the committee is anti-car or pro-potholes.

Liz Kramer is chair of the St. Louis Community Mobility Committee.

“Dangerous streets are dangerous for everyone,” said committee chair Liz Kramer. Saint Louis live tuesday. “But some of the streets that are highlighted in this first round of funding don’t have plans to improve pedestrian infrastructure, cycling infrastructure or bus infrastructure with them.”

Established as an official advisory body to the city in 2020, the Community Mobility Committee works to make the streets, sidewalks and pavements of St. Louis safe and accessible not only for cars, but for pedestrians as well. , cyclists, scooters, wheelchair users and public transport users. .

However, repaving projects planned under a recent bill signed by Mayor Tishaura Jones — which earmarks $84 million in federal COVID relief funds for infrastructure — appear to replicate the design of existing roads. The committee sees this as a missed opportunity.

In a May 9 letter to Jones, the committee urged the mayor “to consider the timing of repaving these segments” and incorporate plans that not only resurface the road, but also make pedestrians a priority.

Says Kramer, “We want to make sure we get the most out of this investment and think holistically about not just repaving, but how can we create ADA-accessible pedestrian crossings? How can we have bike lanes that people actually want to ride on? And it really improves the experience and calms the traffic on our streets? »

This kind of comprehensive planning is necessary, she argues, in light of St. Louis’ disastrous trend in pedestrian fatalities: After nearly doubling in 2020, pedestrian fatalities have remained stubbornly high in 2021.

Kramer noted that the city and some neighborhoods are already involved in traffic planning projects that aim to improve street conditions. These efforts, combined with existing traffic studies, should give the city a solid foundation to approach its busiest streets with more in mind than just a smoother surface.

Kramer suggested that traffic-calming measures such as sidewalk extensions, high-visibility crosswalks and lane schemes that reconfigure the road “can be implemented much more effectively if done at the same time. time as the freshly lowered asphalt”.

So far, Kramer says the committee hasn’t received a response to his letter. Reached for comment on Tuesday, a spokesperson for the mayor’s office provided a written statement noting the Council’s recent approval of $250,000 Estimate and Allocation for a traffic calming and traffic safety study. city-wide pedestrians.

The city’s statement also drew attention to the Louisiana Calm Streets Pilot Project, the first such project undertaken by the city, which is funded by both federal and district funds. The project aims to slow traffic from Gravois Avenue to Meramec Street and consists of installing access ramps and sidewalks near Marquette Park, as well as pinch points, roundabouts and the replacement of sidewalks.

But the committee hopes the city will expand the scope of such measures, especially on less pedestrian-friendly roads like Grand, Kingshighway, Jefferson, Union and Goodfellow – all of which are to be redone under the bill Jones signed into law earlier this month.

Liz Kramer joins St. Louis on the Air

Along with the mayor, Kramer recently participated in a Neighborhood Transformation Roundtable to discuss the city’s transit needs. Kramer says she came out of the meeting optimistic about the administration’s trajectory, particularly in how it focuses on improving transit systems, not just specific streets.

Still, Kramer and the committee hope more can be done for pedestrians and others sharing the road — before federal COVID relief funds run out.

“We have a lot of needs in our city,” Kramer said. “[Jones’] systems approach and the way the city thinks about systems, I think that’s so essential to improving transportation, infrastructure and safety for everyone.

Saint Louis live” tells you the stories of Saint-Louis and the people who live, work and create in our region. The show is hosted by Sarah Fenské and produced by Emily Woodbury, Kayla Drake, Danny Wicentowski and Alex Heuer. Jane Mather-Glass is our production assistant. The sound engineer is Aaron Dorr.

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Naomi Judd recalls song and tears at public memorial http://www.maticezasovska.cz/naomi-judd-recalls-song-and-tears-at-public-memorial/ Mon, 16 May 2022 00:32:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/naomi-judd-recalls-song-and-tears-at-public-memorial/ His daughter, actress Ashley Judd, was greeted onstage at the start of the tribute with a standing ovation. “Thank you for being in the community and fellowshipping with us,” young Judd said. “Because we can pretend to care, but we can’t pretend to show up. So thank you for coming for our mom.” She explained […]]]>

His daughter, actress Ashley Judd, was greeted onstage at the start of the tribute with a standing ovation.

“Thank you for being in the community and fellowshipping with us,” young Judd said. “Because we can pretend to care, but we can’t pretend to show up. So thank you for coming for our mom.”

She explained that her mother wanted the public memorial to stand at Ryman, the former home of the Grand Ole Opry, which she called “the mother church.”

Judd also offered an obituary on his mother before introducing his older sister, Wynonna, who emotionally performed a song their mother wrote, “River of Time.”

“I hold back a flood of tears / I just think of those happy years,” Wynonna Judd sang. “Like all the good times that are gone. My love is gone, gone, gone forever.”

The event was hosted by Judd family friend and “Good Morning America” ​​co-host Robin Roberts.

“She loved with all her heart and I know she would be so touched by the outpouring of love in all of our hearts tonight, especially the love for her daughters,” Roberts said of Judd.

Wynonna and Naomi Judd formed the Grammy-winning duo The Judds, and many of their hits have been performed by current artists including Little Big Town, Jamey Johnson, EmmyLou Harris with Allison Russell and Brad Paisley.

Members of the Gaither Vocal Band also performed a gospel song in tribute to Judd’s love of spiritual music.

Rock star Bono appeared in a video where he recited the lyrics to Judd’s song, “Guardian Angel.” Other stars also made remarks via video, including Oprah Winfrey, Salma Hayek, Reese Witherspoon, Morgan Freeman and Bette Midler.

Judd’s husband, Larry Strickland, spoke to those gathered, explaining that his wife had never met a stranger and enjoyed talking to everyone she met.

He read an email he received from a man who met his wife on a flight and shared how Judd expressed his love for her husband and their life together.

“Needless to say, it brought me great pleasure and comfort,” Strickland said, fondly.

Wynonna Judd made audiences laugh by poking fun at her sometimes tumultuous relationship with her mother.

“We’re showing the world what a dysfunctional family does,” she said, looking at her sister and Strickland. “You show up for each other.”

She returned to the stage to perform “The Rose” with Brandi Carlile.

Judd announced that to honor her mother, she planned to continue the tour they were supposed to do together. She then closed the show with a catchy rendition of “Love Can Build a Bridge.”

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A community town hall on June 3 at UNLV http://www.maticezasovska.cz/a-community-town-hall-on-june-3-at-unlv/ Sat, 14 May 2022 08:58:48 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/a-community-town-hall-on-june-3-at-unlv/ The public is invited to “Combating Racism and Discrimination: A Community Town Hall” at UNLV’s Philip J. Cohen Theater in the Student Union on Friday, June 3, 6-8 p.m. The free event is hosted by the Clark County Asian American Pacific Islanders Community Commission in partnership with the UNLV Filipinx American Student Association. Doors open […]]]>

The public is invited to “Combating Racism and Discrimination: A Community Town Hall” at UNLV’s Philip J. Cohen Theater in the Student Union on Friday, June 3, 6-8 p.m.

The free event is hosted by the Clark County Asian American Pacific Islanders Community Commission in partnership with the UNLV Filipinx American Student Association. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. Parking is free and attendees can park in any staff, student or metered parking spot. Lot D is the closest to the place of the event. A map: https://www.unlv.edu/maps/parking/lots/lot-d.

The purpose of the event is to educate the community about intolerance, xenophobia and anti-Asian sentiment, organizers said.

The panel will share their experiences with racism and discuss how to move forward and “fight back”. Questions from the audience will be entertained. Panelists include Jai Marshall of No Racism in Schools; Cecia Alvarado of Somos Votantes (We are voters); Dr. Crystal Lee of United Natives; André Wade, State Director Silver State Equality; and Raina Ladislao from the Katao school. The moderator will be Athar Haseebullah, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Nevada.

The 15-member Clark County Asian-American Pacific Islander Community Commission was established in July 2019 and tasked with several tasks, including (1) identifying the unique social and economic needs of each Asian/Islander ethnic group of the Pacific and all groups combined, (2) organizing a resource conference addressing these needs, and (3) conducting a feasibility study for the development of a cultural center. The group meets monthly. Board members are civic leaders, business owners, and students from multiple AAPI backgrounds.

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Clark County is a dynamic and innovative organization dedicated to providing superior service with integrity, respect and accountability. With jurisdiction over the famous Las Vegas Strip and covering an area the size of New Jersey, Clark is the 11and-the largest county and provides extensive regional services to 2.3 million citizens and 45.6 million visitors per year (2019). Included are the 7 of the nationand– Busiest airport, air quality compliance, social services and the largest public hospital in the state, University Medical Center. The county also provides municipal services that are traditionally provided by cities to 1 million people in the unincorporated area. These include fire protection, roads and other public works, parks and recreation, and planning and development.

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Homer finds comfort in the community after his arrest for murder http://www.maticezasovska.cz/homer-finds-comfort-in-the-community-after-his-arrest-for-murder/ Thu, 12 May 2022 20:53:25 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/homer-finds-comfort-in-the-community-after-his-arrest-for-murder/ Anesha “Duffy” Murnane, resident of Homer. (Homer Police Department) The Homer community is struggling to come to terms with this week’s news of an arrest being made in the disappearance of Anesha “Duffy” Murnane. Kirby Calderwood, a 32-year-old former Homer resident, was arrested Monday in Ogden, Utah, on charges of kidnapping, first- and second-degree murder […]]]>

Anesha “Duffy” Murnane, resident of Homer. (Homer Police Department)

The Homer community is struggling to come to terms with this week’s news of an arrest being made in the disappearance of Anesha “Duffy” Murnane.

Kirby Calderwood, a 32-year-old former Homer resident, was arrested Monday in Ogden, Utah, on charges of kidnapping, first- and second-degree murder and tampering with evidence in Murnane’s death.

The arrest follows a multi-year, community-wide search for Murnane that began in October 2019. Murane disappeared on October 17, 2019 while on his way to a doctor’s appointment downtown of Homer, in broad daylight.

Christina Whiting helped organize the search and commemoration efforts.

“I think people are in shock,” she said. “I think there’s a lot of shock and numbness, and it’s quite overwhelming.”

The Homer United Methodist Church will open its sanctuary from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday. There will be no schedule, just time to sit in fellowship with others.

“People are invited to come and light a candle and sit in reflection. It’s going to be as simple as that,” Whiting said. “A lot of us mourn privately in our homes. And I hope those who are grieving have support systems, but having a place to go, you know, a church, a shrine, whether you’re a person faith or not is, I think, a very beautiful thing.

A candlelit remembrance will be held at WKFL Park next week, the site of many vigils to remember Murnane and keep hope and research efforts alive. The date and time will be announced on the Bring Duffy Home Facebook page. And the dedication and unveiling of the completed Loved and Lost Memorial Bench will take place at 1 p.m. on June 12 at the Homer Public Library. There will be a community potluck, as well as a link to watch online for those who cannot attend.

The bench was a year in the making, designed by artist Homer Brad Hughes with vision from Murnane’s parents, Sara and Ed Berg. It is meant to honor not only Murnane, but the epidemic of so many deaths due to murder or kidnapping. One side depicts the victims, the other the mourning left behind, hands reaching out to an eternal flame. The numbers represent all ethnicities and ages. The grief felt over Murnane’s murder is not unique to Homer.

“It’s Sara and Ed’s vision to create this bench for their daughter, for the community,” Whiting said. “Also, you know, to bring awareness to the issue of the number of missing people in Alaska, especially in the native communities, but also across the country, around the world.”

Whiting said the bench dedication had been in the works for months. Building it has been healing, giving the community a tangible way to show support and create something meaningful out of tragedy. Although the full extent of the tragedy only became known this week.

“I don’t know. I’m not naive, I’m not stupid. But I was hoping she was out there somewhere that could still go home,” Whiting said.

The arrest finally offers answers to what happened to Murnane. But these are not easy answers.

RELATED: Former Homer resident kidnapped, murdered woman missing since 2019, police say

According to court documents, Calderwood picked up Murnane from her car on Pioneer Avenue as she drove from her apartment to a doctor’s appointment. They had known each other since Calderwood worked at Main Tree Housing, the supportive housing complex where Murnane lived. They also used to eat together through a meal program run by South Peninsula Behavioral Services.

The lead investigator in the case reports interviewing Calderwood’s former partners, as well as his current wife in Utah, who allegedly called last month that Calderwood confessed to the murder. Police had identified Calderwood as a possible suspect since May 2021. The tip-off in April and a subsequent search in Utah produced hard evidence, including a watch that once belonged to Murnane.

The report presents a history of Calderwood’s violence and sexual assaults on his former partners. The affidavit states that Calderwood took Murnane to an unoccupied house in Homer, where he assaulted and killed her. Calderwood left Homer for Utah in 2021.

“The fact that she knows him, and that’s what’s so devastating,” Whiting said. “You know she knew him and she trusted him and he stopped and offered to drive her and she got in. And it’s such a loss of innocence. Even for me. I’m a woman of 52 years old and I think, I don’t know, in a way it’s different from a stranger abduction. In a way it feels different.

A statement released by the family says that if Calderwood is found guilty, they will be deeply relieved that he is off the streets and can no longer knock. They thanked the community for their support over the past two years.

Whiting echoes that thank you.

“It’s really hard to put gratitude into words, and we know they will guide us and keep this family uplifted through the memorial and the dedication, which is going to be beautiful and difficult,” she said. “And then the road this family will take to trial will be very difficult and, I’m sure, devastating. So we are grateful to everyone in the community who has shown love and support from all the different ways they have.

Fundraising efforts for the memorial bench have raised $34,000 so far. The goal is to raise $80,000.

If enough is raised to cover the cost of the bench, Whiting said, anything extra will be used to create models so other communities can create their own bench to remember their lost loved ones. Donations can be made through a GoFundMe page or through Homer United Methodist Church. Other fundraisers are also planned.

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Cambridge Advances $3 Million Proposal for Department of Community Safety, Seeking to Provide Non-Police Public Safety Alternatives | News http://www.maticezasovska.cz/cambridge-advances-3-million-proposal-for-department-of-community-safety-seeking-to-provide-non-police-public-safety-alternatives-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 05:18:02 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/cambridge-advances-3-million-proposal-for-department-of-community-safety-seeking-to-provide-non-police-public-safety-alternatives-news/ Cambridge City Council’s finance committee voted unanimously on Tuesday to advance a $3 million proposal for a planned community safety service. The committee approved the proposal at a fiscal year 2023 budget meeting. The proposal will now go to a full board vote with a favorable recommendation from the finance committee. If approved, the CSD […]]]>

Cambridge City Council’s finance committee voted unanimously on Tuesday to advance a $3 million proposal for a planned community safety service.

The committee approved the proposal at a fiscal year 2023 budget meeting. The proposal will now go to a full board vote with a favorable recommendation from the finance committee.

If approved, the CSD would serve as a launch point for the city’s non-policing emergency response programs, organizing initiatives such as the Cambridge Alternative Response Program, which would be tasked with responding to mental health crises and to other non-violent emergencies.

Cambridge launched its exploration of non-policing public safety alternatives in response to the murder of George Floyd in May 2020. The council issued an order in June establishing an alternative public safety task force with a mandate to propose changes to the city’s approach to policing and public safety in general.

Councilman Marc C. McGovern, who co-chaired the task force, said in an interview that CDS would allow the city to rethink public safety while moving away from criminal punishment for homelessness, health issues mental and substance use disorders.

“We need more and different resources for people who need services but may not want to rely on the police,” McGovern said.

The CSD would also be responsible for coordinating public safety initiatives beyond Cambridge’s city government, with the city allocating around $1.5 million to “community programs and services”.

Christina Giacobbe, who leads the city’s emergency communications, said the Holistic Alternative Emergency Response Team — a resident-led public safety alternative — could be one of the organizations CDS works with. associates.

“We hope HEART will work with us and we think we’re on the verge of really understanding each other,” Giacobbe said.

HEART spokeswoman Stephanie Guirand said the organization was concerned about how CSD would operate in practice, citing CDS’s proposed six-member staff.

“We still don’t know exactly what this department will do,” Guirand said. “If four to six people can get 10% of 911 calls, then we have to wonder why the city increased the police budget and why the police have such a strong force in the first place.”

The proposed 2023 budget for the Cambridge Police Department has increased by nearly 7%, from around $69 million to more than $73 million.

Although HEART does not explicitly coordinate with the police, CSD would have access to police radios and could relay calls to the Cambridge Police Department.

In an interview, Councilman Quinton Y. Zondervan said CSD’s collaboration with police is “exactly why [the proposal] is not good enough”, adding that “what we really want is a HEART model”.

McGovern said he understands why some residents would prefer emergency response assistance outside of city government given CDS’s coordination with police.

“It’s a ministry of government – no matter where they are housed, no matter where they sit, there are people who won’t want to deal with it, and they should have another answer,” he said. -he declares. “HEART could be another answer.”

McGovern added that the city does not view the HEART proposal as mutually exclusive with the new department, and that Cambridge has sufficient financial resources to support both initiatives.

Councilwoman E. Denise Simmons told the meeting that she was also optimistic about the future of CSD and its new approach to community safety.

“It has been a pleasure to do this groundbreaking work on behalf of the city and its citizens,” Simmons said. “It was truly a collaborative and engaged process and I can’t wait to see its outcome.”

— Managing Editor Sarah Girma can be reached at sarah.girma@thecrimson.com. Follow her on Twitter at @SarahGirma_.

– Writer Brandon L. Kingdollar can be reached at brandon.kingdollar@thecrimson.com. Follow him on Twitter at @newskingdollar.

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Chaffee County Public Health Launches Chaffee Community Clinic http://www.maticezasovska.cz/chaffee-county-public-health-launches-chaffee-community-clinic/ Mon, 09 May 2022 14:13:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/chaffee-county-public-health-launches-chaffee-community-clinic/ Chaffee County Public Health (CCPH) will launch a new pilot project called Chaffee Community Clinic (CCC) in Salida on May 23 and Buena Vista on May 31. The inspiration for this initiative came from the most recent Community Health Assessment, where access to basic medical and dental care and services for mental health and addictions […]]]>

Chaffee County Public Health (CCPH) will launch a new pilot project called Chaffee Community Clinic (CCC) in Salida on May 23 and Buena Vista on May 31.

The inspiration for this initiative came from the most recent Community Health Assessment, where access to basic medical and dental care and services for mental health and addictions issues was high on the county’s list of concerned citizens. from Chaffee.

The Chaffee Community Clinic aims to serve people who are homeless, undocumented, low-income, those struggling with substance use disorders and others who have traditionally had difficulty accessing health care through an approach holistic physical, mental and emotional well-being.

The Chaffee Community Clinic will operate as a mobile medical and harm reduction clinic.
Medical services provided by Chaffee Community Clinic will include oral health screening
and limited treatment, basic wound care, smoking cessation, diabetes and cardiovascular disease
testing, HIV and hepatitis C testing, testing and treatment for sexually transmitted infections and
immunizations. Clinic staff will also connect individuals with behavioral health, housing and
aging navigation, help with Medicaid enrollment, and help customers connect with a doctor
home doctor or specialist. Risk reduction services will include the safe disposal of
needles and syringes, free sterile syringes (Salida only), Narcan, fentanyl test strips,
acu-detox, overdose prevention education, recovery and peer support, and connection to
MAT (Medication Assisted Therapy).

“Ensuring access to health and wellness services and supports, especially for those who face the most barriers, is a top priority for CCPH and our local health system. Through coordination and collaboration, CCC aims to meet people where they are, assess their needs in an environment that suits them, and provide quality on-site services or make appropriate warm transfers to programs and to suppliers who can best serve them. For nearly six months, the CCC Planning Committee has undergone a wide variety of training, worked through protocols and procedures, and prepared to provide this service to our community in the most thoughtful, sensitive, and non-stigmatizing manner. . This project is fully funded through the support of public and private grants. We know we will have many lessons to learn and hope our county will walk alongside us as we strive to improve the landscape of health and wellbeing for all in Chaffee County,” said Andrea Carlstrom , director of the CCPH.

In Salida, the Chaffee Community Clinic will be open from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday from
May 23 in the parking lot of the Salida United Methodist Church. Services will be provided in
both a mobile sanitary caravan as well as in rooms donated by the church.

In Buena Vista, the clinic will be open starting May 31 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Tuesdays at
Buena Vista Congregational United Church parking lot. Services will be provided in
both a mobile sanitary caravan as well as in rooms donated by the church.

Dan R.

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Afghanistan: Taliban order women to stay at home; to cover in public | http://www.maticezasovska.cz/afghanistan-taliban-order-women-to-stay-at-home-to-cover-in-public/ Sat, 07 May 2022 18:45:37 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/afghanistan-taliban-order-women-to-stay-at-home-to-cover-in-public/ According to information received by UNAMA, this is a formal directive rather than a recommendation, any violation of which will result in the punishment of male relatives. UNAMA is deeply concerned by today’s announcement by the Taliban that all women must cover their faces in public, must only leave their homes when necessary and that […]]]>

According to information received by UNAMA, this is a formal directive rather than a recommendation, any violation of which will result in the punishment of male relatives.

This decision contradicts numerous assurances regarding the respect and protection of the human rights of all Afghans, including those of women and girls.which had been provided to the international community by representatives of the Taliban during discussions and negotiations over the past decade,” the UNAMA statement read.

After the Taliban took power in August 2021, the Taliban ensured that women would benefit from their rights, whether in work, education or society in general.

Women’s rights in the line of fire, once again

Reports on the decree, which calls on women to show only their eyes and recommends that they wear the burqa from head to toe, say this latest reduction in their rights in the country evokes similar restrictions from the former regime of Taliban between 1996 and 2001.

It also follows the reneging on an earlier promise to appease their intransigent regime at the expense of further alienation from the international community, which was eagerly awaiting signs that the de facto the authority is ready for positive relations with the rest of the world.

After taking power, the Taliban confirmed in September that secondary schools were reopening, but only boys would return to class.

Female teachers across the country have also been unable to return to work.

Six weeks ago, the de facto The authorities have again decided to postpone the secondary education of Afghan girls – drawing widespread international, regional and local condemnation.

Ask for clarification

This latest move by the Taliban threatens to further strain engagement with the international community.

UNAMA will immediately request meetings with the Taliban de facto authorities to seek clarification on the status of this decisionthe statement continued, adding that UNAMA would also engage in consultations with members of the international community regarding the implications of this latest decree.

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