covid pandemic – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 18:12:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-4-150x150.png covid pandemic – Matice Zasovska http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ 32 32 Mayor Adams, NYC Parks Marks Important Milestone Towards Recovery With Over 100 Projects Beginning Construction T http://www.maticezasovska.cz/mayor-adams-nyc-parks-marks-important-milestone-towards-recovery-with-over-100-projects-beginning-construction-t/ Sun, 13 Mar 2022 16:11:52 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/mayor-adams-nyc-parks-marks-important-milestone-towards-recovery-with-over-100-projects-beginning-construction-t/ March 13, 2022 Video available at: https://youtu.be/uBsIodgbVKU 417 million capital investments for more than 100 projects suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic will go into construction this spring Projects focus on sustainability and equity: 86% of projects include sustainable features, 62% are located in underserved neighborhoods Mayor Adams and Commissioner Donoghue inaugurate the $2.2 million renovation […]]]>

March 13, 2022

Video available at: https://youtu.be/uBsIodgbVKU

417 million capital investments for more than 100 projects suspended during the COVID-19 pandemic will go into construction this spring

Projects focus on sustainability and equity: 86% of projects include sustainable features, 62% are located in underserved neighborhoods

Mayor Adams and Commissioner Donoghue inaugurate the $2.2 million renovation of the Saratoga Playground at the Brownsville/BedStuy border

NEW YORK – New York City Mayor Eric Adams and New York City Department of Parks and Recreation Commissioner Sue Donoghue announced today that the city will open 104 previously paused park projects this spring, an increase an incredible 142% increase in park construction plans over 2021. Adams and Commissioner Donoghue made the announcement at Saratoga Playground in Brownsville, where the city broke ground on a complete playground renovation at 2.2 millions of dollars.

“New York’s parks are not luxuries, but necessities – playing a vital role in building community and nurturing our physical, mental and emotional health,” said Mayor Adams. “Parks can be great equalizers, which is why every New Yorker, regardless of zip code or color, deserves access to a park. This $417 million investment to revitalize more than 100 parks , playgrounds and green spaces is an important step in our recovery that will pay dividends for generations to come.

“The pandemic lockdown has proven how important parks and open spaces are to all New Yorkers and we couldn’t be happier to move forward with more than $417 million in development projects. capital assets that update, improve and redesign our parks and playgrounds for community members. who rely on them,” said Parks Commissioner Donoghue. “There’s no better place to make this announcement than Saratoga Park in Brooklyn, where we’re completely modernizing a neighborhood playground that hasn’t seen major upgrades in over 20 years.”

Previously suspended in purchases due to the construction pause related to the COVID-19 pandemic, the more than 100 park improvement projects, which are expected to start this spring, represent more than $417 million in investments, making the city’s public green spaces more sustainable, accessible and vibrant.

Over 86% of these projects include sustainability features such as LED lighting, rain gardens, planting new trees, on-site rainwater catchment, and the use of recycled and resilient materials. Additionally, 62% of projects are in underserved neighborhoods, as identified by the Racial Inclusion and Equity Task Force. These projects are expected to take 12-18 months to complete; New Yorkers will be able to enjoy 100 newly renovated park projects in their neighborhoods by summer 2023.

Mayor Adams and Commissioner Donahue made today’s announcement at Saratoga Park Playground in Brooklyn. Saratoga Park is a treasured community park on the border of Brownsville and Bedford Stuyvesant. It is the second largest park in the Historic District and is home to a bronze and pink granite memorial dedicated to the residents of the community who gave their lives during World War I. The play area is currently under construction and will soon have new play equipment including swings, a power shower, a children’s play area, floor play, new lighting and restoration of the surrounding lawn. The $2.183 million project is funded by the city council and is expected to be completed by spring 2023.

“As warm weather approaches, I commend Mayor Adams for calling on the city to resume renovations to our park spaces across the city,” said new York State Senator Kevin Parker. “It is important that we provide safe green space options in downtown communities for our young people and their families to enjoy during the spring and summer months. »

“I look forward to the completion of Loreto Park and the other parks in my district,” said new York State Assemblyman Michael R. Benedetto. “I am especially pleased that construction of the living 9/11 Memorial Pole at Ferry Point Park will begin this spring. For years, I have drawn attention to this solemn memorial dedicated to the victims of September 11, donated by the Prince of Monaco. Located at the highest elevation in the park, it offers visitors sweeping, unobstructed views of lower Manhattan. I commend the Adams administration for prioritizing the flagpole project.

“As someone whose district is blessed with the beautiful 500-acre forest park, I cherish our green space,” said new York State Assembly Member Jenifer Rajkumar. “Parks clean the air we breathe, promote our mental and physical health, and bring everyone together to enjoy nature. They are the ultimate egalitarian public good, serving people of all backgrounds. Mayor Adams knows that all New Yorkers, including those in underserved areas of the city like mine, deserve access to a world-class park and his latest initiative will provide just that.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed countless disparities in our society, including access to state-of-the-art parks and green spaces that all families deserve to enjoy in their own neighborhoods, regardless of zip code,” said Queens Borough President Donovan Richards Jr. “I look forward to a spring full of shovels in the dirt across Queens as we expand our network of sustainable recreation and relaxation spaces for all of our families, especially those in historically underserved communities.”

“Two years now into this pandemic, New Yorkers have seen how parks, playgrounds and public spaces can revive and restore our communities,” said New York City Council member Shekar Krishnan. “We need to build more parks, plant more trees and do it faster than ever. Inaugurating over 100 new park projects this spring is a great start and I’m excited to be working with the Mayor on this effort.

“This initiative is another sign that our mayor is committed to weathering the pandemic as we move forward with plans for a greener, more sustainable New York City by pursuing projects in our parks,” said New York City Board Member Joann Ariola. “New York City parks are an integral part of our communities.”

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Ten Onondaga County Nonprofits Receive County COVID-19 Response Fund Grant http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ten-onondaga-county-nonprofits-receive-county-covid-19-response-fund-grant/ Fri, 11 Mar 2022 16:55:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/ten-onondaga-county-nonprofits-receive-county-covid-19-response-fund-grant/ Onondaga County on Wednesday awarded 11 grants to 10 organizations from its COVID-19 Response Fund at an event held at AccessCNY, located at 1603 Court St. in Syracuse. Those pictured (left to right) include Paul Joslyn, Executive Director of AccessCNY; Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon; Carolyn Brown, executive director of PEACE, Inc.; and Brian […]]]>

Onondaga County on Wednesday awarded 11 grants to 10 organizations from its COVID-19 Response Fund at an event held at AccessCNY, located at 1603 Court St. in Syracuse. Those pictured (left to right) include Paul Joslyn, Executive Director of AccessCNY; Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon; Carolyn Brown, executive director of PEACE, Inc.; and Brian Fay, executive director of the Syracuse Northeast Community Center. (Photo credit: Onondaga County)

SYRACUSE, NY – Onondaga County on Wednesday awarded 11 grants to 10 organizations from its COVID-19 Response Fund.

Onondaga County Executive Ryan McMahon announced the awards at an event

held Wednesday at AccessCNY, located at 1603 Court St. in Syracuse.

As the county explained in its press release, the COVID-19 Response Fund has sought to “address the social service needs and improve the quality of life of Onondaga County populations disproportionately affected by the COVID19 pandemic”.

The effort had a “particular focus” on the county’s young and elderly populations.

The fund had $1 million, with maximum funding awards of $100,000 each.

Grant recipients

Onondaga County provided a list of the 11 grants awarded to 10 recipients and a description of how the nonprofits will use the grants.

AccessCNY will use two scholarships for funding. The only grant, totaling nearly $99,000,

connect people living with an intellectual disability, acquired brain injury or mental health diagnosis, with needed services, including increased medical appointment attendance, decreased food insecurity and decreased feelings of social isolation.

The second grant, a bursary of over $94,000, is for caregiver training. The funding will allow AccessCNY to increase awareness and collaboration across systems and develop a program to provide educational resources and supports for unpaid caregivers of people with mental health diagnoses.

ACR Health will use its $100,000 grant for a mobile health services team. The funding will help the organization improve outreach, education, harm reduction and prevention services for people with opioid use disorders and/or those at increased risk for HIV/STDs.

Aurora of Central New York, Inc. will use its $100,000 for a safety awareness project for people with vision and hearing loss. The grant will enable Aurora to ensure appropriate access and utilization of mental and physical health services using appropriate sign language interpreting services for America’s new Deaf community and Deaf Americans. It will also use the funding to help reduce the isolation of seniors with vision or hearing loss by providing training in adaptive and assistive technologies.

CirCare received a grant of nearly $79,000 for a parent project. He will use the money to implement the Parent Project Model, an evidence-based curriculum that helps parents develop strategies to deal with “some of the most challenging behaviors” exhibited in their school-aged children. .

Contact Community Services, Inc. plans to use its $100,000 grant for a TeleCare project to make reassurance phone calls for isolated and vulnerable seniors, including daily wellness checks and medication reminders.

Elmcrest Children’s Center received a $100,000 grant for non-traditional child care at the Northside Early Education Center. The organization will use the money to implement a pilot program to provide licensed center child care during non-traditional hours (5 p.m. to 12 a.m.) for parents working the second shift.

Empower Parkinson, Inc. will use a grant of more than $77,000 to expand services for people with Parkinson’s disease. The funding will help pay for efforts to

expand service delivery, including boxing, other fitness activities, education, support and socialization for people with Parkinson’s disease.

PEACE, Inc. plans to use its $100,000 grant for a program focused on modifying on-site seniors’ residences. The funding will help PEACE, Inc. improve the physical environments of seniors eligible for the Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP) so they can stay in their homes safely. This includes activities such as installing ramps, widening doorways, and modifications to accommodate medical devices.

Contact CNY, Inc. will use its nearly $51,000 grant for a childbirth education program for refugee and immigrant women and families. Funding will help Reach CNY use

certified childbirth educators and medical interpreters trained to deliver “high quality” childbirth education classes to pregnant women in Onondaga County whose native language is Somali, Arabic, Swahili or Kinyarwanda.

Northeast Syracuse Community Center received a $100,000 grant to improve and expand existing basic needs and services for seniors while working to implement a comprehensive “food farm program” model.

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Governor Evers Announces Grant Program Recipients http://www.maticezasovska.cz/governor-evers-announces-grant-program-recipients/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 01:11:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/governor-evers-announces-grant-program-recipients/ MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) – Governor Tony Evers was at Madison College today to announce the five recipients of a grant program. The $20 million Neighborhood Investment Grant Fund is part of a $650 million grant announced by Governor Evers for the entire state. The money includes affordable housing redevelopment projects, investments in local businesses and […]]]>

MADISON, Wis. (WMTV) – Governor Tony Evers was at Madison College today to announce the five recipients of a grant program.

The $20 million Neighborhood Investment Grant Fund is part of a $650 million grant announced by Governor Evers for the entire state.

The money includes affordable housing redevelopment projects, investments in local businesses and the expansion of cultural opportunities in minority communities.

“Each of these issues affects all the others. That’s why these investments and projects, that’s what it’s all about. And I couldn’t be happier to be here today to support them. All of these issues are intertwined, and all are critical to building the kind of future we want to see for our children, for our state, and for each other,” Governor Evers said.

Governor Evers said the grant money comes from the economic surplus to help people continue to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Funded projects include the development or redevelopment of the following:

  • The Bayview Foundation Housing and Community Center at the Triangle
  • Madison Public Market
  • Greater Madison Urban League Black Business Hub
  • Centro Hispano Community Center
  • The Center for Black Excellence and Culture

Copyright 2022 WMTV. All rights reserved.

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Announcing the winners of the Mark Gunter Youth Cyclist Support Program http://www.maticezasovska.cz/announcing-the-winners-of-the-mark-gunter-youth-cyclist-support-program/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 05:21:48 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/announcing-the-winners-of-the-mark-gunter-youth-cyclist-support-program/ As part of the annual Mark Gunter Photographer of the Year awards, we use proceeds from the entry to donate to causes that were close to Mark’s heart. In addition to our donation to cancer research (via Tour de Cure), we are also asking for nominations from young cyclists who need a helping hand on […]]]>

As part of the annual Mark Gunter Photographer of the Year awards, we use proceeds from the entry to donate to causes that were close to Mark’s heart. In addition to our donation to cancer research (via Tour de Cure), we are also asking for nominations from young cyclists who need a helping hand on their journey and giving a cash donation of up to $1,000 for help them on their way. It’s not much in the scheme of things, but it can make a big difference – it can help buy a year of training, a plane ticket to Europe, a block of groceries or whatever whatever the next roadblock.

Past nominees included riders who competed in the Olympics, got WorldTour contracts, or just went as far as they wanted (which is also okay!)

Each year we ask a professional cyclist who knows what it’s like to climb the ranks to choose the recipients of this award. In the past, judges have included Koen de Kort, Marianne Vos and Richie Porte.

This year, we asked Sarah Gigante, pro cyclist and Team Movistar Olympian (also a VeloClub member, former Youth Rider Support nominee, and a wonderful person) if she would do the honours. Gigante reviewed the dozens of nominees and chose the cash prize recipients. Not an easy task!

And now, Sarah Gigante’s turn to announce who the recipients are…

by Sarah Gigante

It was such an honor to be able to help choose the recipients of the Mark Gunter Young Cyclist Assistance program for 2022. Loved working alongside Leeane Gatien [Mark’s wife]Lucas [Mark’s son] and Wade, and to be able to play a small but important role in celebrating Mark and what he has done, and what his legacy continues to do, for the cycling community. Also, having the privilege of discovering so many passionate and enthusiastic young cyclists and their efforts to achieve their dreams has warmed my heart.

It was wonderful to see how far the news of the Mark Gunter Young Cyclist Assistance program has traveled this year – we received many entries, from eleven different countries! Of course, this excellent recovery only made our job of reducing the roster to just three riders even more difficult. Every young cyclist who applied would have deserved a scholarship, and I just wanted to say, before announcing the winners, that I wish I could give you all $1,000! I hope and believe that you will achieve all the goals that you proudly shared in your applications. Thanks for giving me some insight into your cycling dreams, and I’ll follow from afar as I pursue mine – maybe I’ll see you there!

The first candidate I would like to award $1,000 to is a young man from Sierra Leone, Abu Sheik Sesay (pictured above, left). You might not know his name yet, but you probably know his face, because Matt Grayson’s stunning photo showing Abu Sheik’s elation after a Tour de Lunsar podium won second place in the professional category of Mark Gunter Photographer of the Year Awards! Reading the context surrounding Sierra Leonean cycling has given me a lot of perspective on the difference a grant like this will hopefully make in the career of a passionate young cyclist. Abu Sheik is certainly one of those cyclists, and I really hope that this money will allow him to travel to Rwanda and join the African Rising Cycling Centre. Abu Sheik’s application was extremely well written and opened my eyes to the fact that there has never been a professional Sierra Leonean cyclist yet – but I hope Abu Sheik can change that and inspire others to follow in his footsteps. Good luck Abu Sheikh!

Another very worthy $1,000 winner is 18-year-old Chilean track and road cyclist Carlos Rodriguez (pictured above, right). Despite his young age, he has already shown tremendous physical and mental prowess having won eleven national titles in the seven years he has raced. Unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic ruined the two years he was in the Junior Under 19 category, which meant he missed the opportunity to race on a wider stage, at the Junior World Championships. As Carlos takes a big step from juniors and continues to pursue his dream of being a top sprinter, I hope this scholarship will help him travel and represent his country at future major competitions in North America. South and around the world, and also to buy the necessary equipment to succeed. I will follow his career closely!

I am very happy that there are three grants to be awarded this year, as this third cyclist has also impressed me greatly, and I look forward to seeing what she can do in the future with the $500 grant made possible by the Mark Gunter Young Cyclist Aid Program. Anya Louw is a 21-year-old road cyclist from Australia who has raced for more than half her life, but is only getting better. At the time of her application, she wrote that she had achieved numerous podiums in the national under-19 and under-23 championships, but in the short time between then and now, she has since become a double national under-23 champion. Despite the courage and strength she has shown in Buninyong and throughout her career, I know that the journey towards realizing her dream of becoming a full-time professional will not be easy or cheap, so I hopes this grant will help her on her trip to Europe this year.

Thank you very much for trusting me with this task. It has been wonderful to learn more about the future of our sport and, as I said before, a real honor to be part of these awards. Good luck to all of the candidates!

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Arlington Recognizes Transit Equity Day with ART Pilot Programs – Official website of the Arlington County Government in Virginia http://www.maticezasovska.cz/arlington-recognizes-transit-equity-day-with-art-pilot-programs-official-website-of-the-arlington-county-government-in-virginia/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 18:10:29 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/arlington-recognizes-transit-equity-day-with-art-pilot-programs-official-website-of-the-arlington-county-government-in-virginia/ Published on February 04, 2022 On February 4, 2022, Arlington County recognizes Transit Equity Day to celebrate the life and legacy of Rosa Parks on her birthday. Transportation is essential to ensure that all Arlington residents can live, work, learn and play in the community. This year, the county is launching two pilot […]]]>

Published on February 04, 2022



On February 4, 2022, Arlington County recognizes Transit Equity Day to celebrate the life and legacy of Rosa Parks on her birthday. Transportation is essential to ensure that all Arlington residents can live, work, learn and play in the community.

This year, the county is launching two pilot programs — the Low-Income Fare Assistance Pilot and the APS Student Fare-Less Pilot — providing free bus access to thousands of students and low-income residents who have been financially and logistically impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“These two pilot programs help further the mission of Realizing Arlington’s Commitment to Equity (RACE), which includes promoting racial equity to reduce and prevent disparities in our service to the community,” said Samia Byrd, Deputy Director of the County, Director of Racing and Equity. . “Even though the law is no longer unequal, systemic barriers still exist. Our examination of transit through an equity lens is to look at access based on need (meeting people where they are) and to work to remove these barriers. Through this, we aim to honor Rosa Parks’ legacy – equal treatment and fair access to public transportation for all.”

With funds from the American Rescue Plan Act, Arlington provides 2,400 middle and high school students with iRide SmarTrip prepaid cards, good for use on Arlington Transit (ART) for the next 18 months. IRide cards were designed specifically for Arlington students, offering half-price ART travel while also working on Metrorail and Metrobus lines.

Collaboration with Arlington Public Schools

The new APS Student Fare-Less pilot expands the collaboration with Arlington Public Schools (APS) and focuses on students whose transportation issues often cannot be resolved by yellow bus service. Among the difficulties: living at the ends of a large walking area and taking immersion programs or other programs outside their home school zone.

Transportation staff will use data from the free student fare pilot project to study peak usage and other ridership patterns for future expansion and program modifications.

Improving transport access to employment

For some residents, the ART bus system is essential for getting to and from work sites. The second pilot project, Low-Income Fare Assistance, will provide free public transit to work for approximately 7,200 residents already enrolled in social service programs for families in the community.

Participants in this pilot project will receive SmarTrip cards preloaded with $150 to use over the next 18 months. In addition to riding on ART, the cards can be used to travel beyond Arlington on Metrobus and Metrorail.

APS will help coordinate the distribution of free student transit passes, while the county’s Department of Human Services (DHS) will coordinate the distribution of adult transit passes.

ART Transit Service COVID Updates

ART, the county’s local bus transit system, suspended all fares in March 2020 and reinstated them in January 2021. ART resumed operation of all bus routes without seat capacity restrictions in September 2021, reinstating four peak-hour lines only suspended in March 2020. Face masks are still mandatory on the ART and all regional public transport.

About Transit Fairness Day

Every year, Transit Fairness Day is celebrated on February 4 to honor the life and legacy of Rosa Parks. Rosa Parks became a key figure in the civil rights era when she refused to give up her seat on a segregated transit bus in Montgomery, Alabama, and was arrested in 1955. Her actions sparked the boycott Montgomery buses and the United States Supreme Court decision declaring segregation. in unconstitutional buses. The actions and legacy of Rosa Parks are intrinsically linked to the concept of transit equity for all.

Learn more about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott at the Library of Congress.

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Pa. Fish and Boat Commission welcomes back trout stocking volunteers, as it did before the pandemic http://www.maticezasovska.cz/pa-fish-and-boat-commission-welcomes-back-trout-stocking-volunteers-as-it-did-before-the-pandemic/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 18:00:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/pa-fish-and-boat-commission-welcomes-back-trout-stocking-volunteers-as-it-did-before-the-pandemic/ The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission will again accept walk-in trout bottom volunteers this year, just as the agency did before the COVID-19 pandemic. “We will be accepting volunteers again, unlike the past two years when we restricted it,” said Tim Schaeffer, executive director of the commission. To limit staff exposure and follow social distancing […]]]>

The Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission will again accept walk-in trout bottom volunteers this year, just as the agency did before the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We will be accepting volunteers again, unlike the past two years when we restricted it,” said Tim Schaeffer, executive director of the commission.

To limit staff exposure and follow social distancing and quarantine restrictions, the commission has only allowed volunteers from its regular volunteer roster to help with storage in each of the past 2 years and in 2020, none storage schedule has been made public.

“Storage during the pandemic has been a challenge, but we have learned a lot over the past two seasons about protecting our staff and volunteers.” said Schaeffer. “This year we will again be working hard to stock trout in the safest and most efficient way possible, while delivering the best product to our anglers in time for opening day.”

Potential volunteers are asked to stay home if they have tested positive for COVID-19 or feel ill. As trout stocking is an outdoor event, volunteers will not be asked to wear masks, but commission staff will likely be masked.

Publication of the stocking schedule, restored last year, will continue as normal this year. The commission plans to make it public in the coming days.

  • Trout stocking schedule reinstated by the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission

Stocking of the 3.2 million hatchery-raised trout will begin the week of Feb. 21 to accommodate the trout fishing schedule earlier across the state this year.

Under a change approved at a commission meeting in October 2021, Pennsylvania returned to a single statewide open day for the trout season which will occur annually on first Saturday in April, and in 2022 will take place on Saturday April 2. Statewide Mentee Youth Trout Day will be held on Saturday, March 26.

“It’s an exciting time of year as we prepare for the incredible task of moving millions of trout from our hatcheries to hundreds of waterways across the state,” Schaeffer added.

Volunteers ranging from fishermen who have helped with storage for decades to families looking for an outing for the kids eagerly await the rolling of the commission’s large white fleet of storage trucks each year.

For more outdoor coverage, subscribe to Marcus Schneck’s free weekly newsletter on Outdoor Pennsylvania here:

You can also contact Schneck at mschneck@pennlive.com.

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Richland man charged with stealing $80,000 in rental assistance http://www.maticezasovska.cz/richland-man-charged-with-stealing-80000-in-rental-assistance/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/richland-man-charged-with-stealing-80000-in-rental-assistance/ Bob Brawdy Tri-City Herald A 71-year-old Richland man is accused of pocketing nearly $80,000 in coronavirus relief money by claiming he was the manager of a distressed rental property. Ronald D. Weis received four checks in 2021 under the Treasury Rent Assistance Program, or T-RAP. The checks were issued by the Benton-Franklin Counties Department of […]]]>

title=

Bob Brawdy

Tri-City Herald

A 71-year-old Richland man is accused of pocketing nearly $80,000 in coronavirus relief money by claiming he was the manager of a distressed rental property.

Ronald D. Weis received four checks in 2021 under the Treasury Rent Assistance Program, or T-RAP.

The checks were issued by the Benton-Franklin Counties Department of Social Services in Kennewick.

Court documents show the department received requests from a person who said he was behind on rent and listed Weis as the tenant’s property manager.

Weis received $78,573 in total between August 31 and December 19.

The documents do not specify how many months the tenant claims to be in arrears with rent.

Weis was questioned by investigators about the money earlier this month and admitted he was not a property manager, according to court documents. He also admitted to cashing the checks, documents show.

He is charged in Benton County Superior Court with first-degree larceny.

This includes the aggravating circumstance allegation that the crime resulted in substantial loss beyond what is typical for a robbery, and that it involved a high degree of sophistication or planning.

Weis has been held in Benton County Jail since January 13. Bail is set at $7,500, with a trial scheduled for March 14.

$2.8 million in Benton-Franklin

The T-RAP program is the federal and Washington state governments’ response to the need for rental assistance during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the state Department of Commerce’s website.

It aims to prevent evictions by helping selected and eligible tenants cover their past, current and future rent.

Recipients can get up to 12 months of assistance, with an additional three months if needed, depending on program guidelines.

Commerce Department data released online shows that Benton-Franklin counties spent $2.8 million in financial assistance from April to November 2021. The data indicates that 565 households received the money, although a number of them may be repeat recipients.

Most of the aid was delivered in October with $789,029 to 169 households.

Statewide, 25,069 households received $168 million in rental assistance, according to department data.

Related stories from the Tri-City Herald

Kristin M. Kraemer covers the justice system and crime issues for the Tri-City Herald. She was a journalist for over 20 years in Washington and California.

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Montana Elks reunite in Great Falls, spotlight scholarship programs http://www.maticezasovska.cz/montana-elks-reunite-in-great-falls-spotlight-scholarship-programs/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:50:00 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/montana-elks-reunite-in-great-falls-spotlight-scholarship-programs/ GREAT FALLS — The Montana Association Elks Mid-Winter Meeting is underway at the Great Falls Elks Club and continues Saturday. The event consists of training seminars and workshops to help improve leadership skills among Elk club leaders across the state of Montana. Montana currently has 26 Elks Lodges. Elks National Manager Jim O’Kelley visited Great […]]]>

GREAT FALLS — The Montana Association Elks Mid-Winter Meeting is underway at the Great Falls Elks Club and continues Saturday.

The event consists of training seminars and workshops to help improve leadership skills among Elk club leaders across the state of Montana.

Montana currently has 26 Elks Lodges.

Elks National Manager Jim O’Kelley visited Great Falls to discuss all the Elks have been able to accomplish over the past year.

“One of the biggest things we were able to do was Covid,” he said. “Obviously, a pandemic is not good, and the Elks have been put in an unusual situation. A lot of our members join for social reasons or for heritage reasons, and socially we’ve been ostracized. gap due to Covid restrictions.

O’Kelly said that even though it was a sudden change and unfamiliar territory among the Elks, they were able to come together and still be able to offer grants in order to help his community.

“A big part of the need we found was food insecurity. Many places where our Elks lodges are located have suffered from security during the pandemic,” he explained. “But I’m happy to say we were able to pull through and can still get the grants and funding we need to help our community.”

Another of the highlights was the scholarship opportunities the Elks offer.

“We are among one of the best individual scholarships in the country,” said Gerald Penn, president of the Elks of Montana scholarship. Montana receives about $22,000 a year to distribute among its students; Nationally, the Elks give about $2.4 million in scholarships each year.

“The biggest scholarship program we have is called the Most Valuable Student Scholarship and students are judged locally by lodge, region, state and then national. Out of Montana, they get four slots to send for the National Fellowship,” O’Kelley said.

Over the past 10 years, three students from Montana have been selected among the top six scholars.

Click here to learn more about moose.

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NJ volunteers helped plan COVID vaccines for the elderly http://www.maticezasovska.cz/nj-volunteers-helped-plan-covid-vaccines-for-the-elderly/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 09:07:19 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/nj-volunteers-helped-plan-covid-vaccines-for-the-elderly/ [ad_1] When Beth Rader struggled to find a COVID vaccine appointment for her parents in January, shortly after the vaccine became available, she turned to a new Facebook page for help in what had quickly become a rush for the world’s most coveted product. Rader heard about a clinic at Kean University in Union, near […]]]>


[ad_1]

When Beth Rader struggled to find a COVID vaccine appointment for her parents in January, shortly after the vaccine became available, she turned to a new Facebook page for help in what had quickly become a rush for the world’s most coveted product.

Rader heard about a clinic at Kean University in Union, near his parents’ home, and got their appointments. Then she noticed that other people were posting to the site desperately seeking help making appointments for loved ones – most of whom were elderly with underlying health issues.

And so Rader, who had the expertise (a background in digital fundraising) and the time (she was between jobs), started spending 12 to 20 hours a day in her apartment in Washington, DC, responding to calls. stranger requests and making appointments on dozens of vendor websites.

As of mid-December, she had made 700 dates in 10 states – the vast majority of them in New Jersey.

“It was first relatives and friends, then it became distant relatives and friends of friends and pretty soon it turned into people that I had no connection with,” said Rader, 30 years old. “It was a really tough time for people.”

There have been countless acts of generosity and kindness performed each day in 2021 by New Jerseyers for New Jerseyans. But this has perhaps been seen nowhere more than in the efforts of an army of vaccine volunteers who have helped thousands of the elderly, the disabled, the chronically ill, caregivers for those confined to home and many more to navigate a convoluted system that seemed to be designed to thwart them.

These were ordinary people – teachers, students, housewives, unemployed, faithful – who spent countless hours making appointments in times of crisis, as hospital admissions rose rapidly and New Jersey averaged. 60 to 80 deaths per day, about four to five times. the rate today.

Their efforts were born out of necessity.

Sandy Thompson is helping people find vaccines, boosters and tests via a Facebook page that she helps moderate while holding her son Dean, 2, in her lap on Tuesday, December 28, 2021.

During the first few months of the campaign, New Jersey received only 100,000 to 200,000 doses per week from the federal stockpile to immunize the millions of qualifying state residents. The campaign’s first month went well when it was limited to healthcare workers, nursing home residents and first responders.

It ended on January 13 when Governor Phil Murphy unexpectedly made over 2 million New Jerseyans immediately eligible and unwittingly created an unfair playing field.

Murphy has allowed anyone 65 and over, people with chronic illnesses, and current and former smokers to book an appointment. Pent-up demand overwhelmed a system that was not ready, despite months of preparation. In one day, several providers refused people and close their dating portals.

The vast majority of appointments could only be booked through a website, which forced the elderly, who accounted for 80% of COVID deaths in the state, to compete with younger, more tech-savvy people. A call center was only set up a week later and had so many problems that it was forced to temporarily close. In order to avoid bureaucratic delays, no proof was required for those who alleged underlying health issues or a smoking habit, but this also made the system ripe to cheat.

“It was a really tough time, especially if you were older,” said Howard Berger, 76, of Teaneck. “People were always dropping like flies and you were always worried that you would have COVID before you could get the vaccine.”

At the same time, a Facebook group debuted with the utilitarian name “New Jersey Covid Vaccine Info” – a brainchild of sisters Brittany Prell Cohen and Brandi Prell, who had made an appointment for their grandmother after receiving one page advice for Florida residents.

Sandy Thompson is helping people find vaccines, boosters and tests via a Facebook page that she helps moderate while holding her son Dean, 2, in her lap on Tuesday, December 28, 2021. Daughter Annabell, 4 , look in the background.

Those looking for help flocked to the page. So did the volunteers, including Sandy Thompson of Parsippany, who started making appointments and posting information on the page, while raising two toddlers and studying for an MBA.

“There were a lot of nights I would give up food on the stove because I got a notification that appointments were available,” Thompson said with a laugh. “And then I would be on the computer with a 20 month old on my lap.”

At first, they spent hours online 24 hours a day refreshing the pages of vaccine suppliers. Then they learned the patterns when drugstore chains and hospitals posted new appointments – usually late at night or early in the morning, when online traffic was lower. They used tools like Twitter notifications to know when a new appointment list is available and AutoFill to load a person’s personal information into a site’s online form as quickly as possible.

The number of page members continued to grow, often by the tens of thousands per week.

Some volunteers have even developed specialties. There were those like Thompson who were especially good at getting information on everything from new vendors to dating advice and getting it out there. There were people including Rader who became volume deliverers thanks to their organizational skills and their ability to manage large spreadsheets with the personal information of those seeking help.

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And then there were people like Jeanne Marie Mirabella, who focused on the more difficult cases. Mirabella used her years navigating the social service system as a mental health counselor to help people with special needs and the confined to the house, or, as she put it, “to reach the hard to reach.”

Like many volunteers, her willingness to help others was fueled in part by a personal frustration with the system – her homebound sister couldn’t get someone into her home for months to come. give it a chance. The state did not have a system for returning home until four five months after the start of the campaign.

“It was intolerable for me not to be able to find one for her,” said Mirabella. “Many people confined to the house were at the greatest risk of death. For me it became a priority to help them.”

The first sign of success came in early March, when the death toll in nursing homes – where residents had been an early target for the vaccine – fell, data showed. The same started for the general population at the end of April.

Recipients come in all shapes and sizes, but many are like Berger, who has had difficulty walking since having surgery two years ago. He was able to get his first two injections at a clinic near his home, with the help of local officials. But when the recall came out, that option no longer existed.

Volunteer Dee Kalman, from Westwood, NJ, contacting an elderly person after making an appointment for the vaccine for her.

After reaching out to NorthJersey.com and The Record for help, Berger was put in touch with Dee Kalman, a Bergen County college professor who made more than 200 appointments for local residents. Not only did Kalman make an appointment, but she picked up Berger and drove him to a CVS in Hackensack.

“She doesn’t even know me and yet she came to my house and took me to my date,” Berger said. ” Who do this ? “

The Facebook page still has 131,000 members today. After the summer lull, activity returned, with booster shots requested and parents looking to make appointments for their children.

Beth Rader has stacks of thank you cards. Some people have sent him gift cards or donated to a charity close to his heart. She even went to a Mets game over the summer with one of the people she helped.

“People have stereotypes about what it is like to be from New Jersey,” she said. “Yes, we love our bagels and we can be brash. But I think that was something that was so authentically New Jersey. I’m in a group for people in Virginia and DC, and there isn’t the same level of community that we have with the New Jersey group.

“The world is a bit sucky these days, and you need the right things,” Rader said. “And that was one of them. It makes me really proud to be from New Jersey.”

Scott Fallon has covered the COVID-19 pandemic since its onset in March 2020. To get unlimited access to the latest news regarding the pandemic’s impact on New Jersey, please register or activate your digital account today.

E-mail: fallon@northjersey.com

Twitter: @newsfallon


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Kansas City health officials optimistic about recent COVID case counts http://www.maticezasovska.cz/kansas-city-health-officials-optimistic-about-recent-covid-case-counts/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 00:55:58 +0000 http://www.maticezasovska.cz/kansas-city-health-officials-optimistic-about-recent-covid-case-counts/ [ad_1] KANSAS CITY, Mo. – When it comes to COVID-19, there is cautious optimism in the public health community. The head of the World Health Organization is speaking out, saying he believes the global pandemic has a good chance of ending in the coming year. Kansas City subway doctors and public health officials are optimistic, […]]]>


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KANSAS CITY, Mo. – When it comes to COVID-19, there is cautious optimism in the public health community.

The head of the World Health Organization is speaking out, saying he believes the global pandemic has a good chance of ending in the coming year. Kansas City subway doctors and public health officials are optimistic, but uncertain.

At the end of last week, General Tedros Adanom Ghebreyesus, the head of the WHO, addressed an audience at the last WHO briefing of 2021. He reportedly said: “2022 must be the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. We know the virus very well and we have all the tools to fight it. “

The WHO leader believes science and medical advances are making this possible. Here in the Kansas City area, hospitalizations are up slightly for at least one hospital.

The most recent patient totals from major Kansas City metro hospitals show the University of Kansas health care system had 63 patients as of Monday.

A spokesperson for the St. Luke Health System said 136 COVID-19 patients were in that hospital system on Sunday and, on Monday, University Health, formerly known as Truman Medical Center, had 63 active cases.

” We do not know. We don’t have a crystal ball, ”said Dr. Dana Hawkinson, an infectious disease specialist with the University of Kansas Health System. “We certainly have the resources to do it. We have the technology and the science to do it, but we need to be able to reap the benefits of science, which is vaccinations. “

Hawkinson is an optimist, as is Ghebreyesus, but he is among those who believe it is too early for the victory laps.

Subway health officials said on Monday that 51% of people living in the Kansas City area were fully immunized, and while the WHO may be right globally, there is still work to be done in many communities.

“We know how to make sure it’s not scary. We know how to make COVID something we could possibly live with, but we’re not taking these steps in this region right now, ”said Christina Heinen, director of the City of Independence, Missouri Health Department.

The Christmas season will likely affect total hospitalizations in the near future. Doctors saw spikes in infection rates after Thanksgiving in November and after the 2020 holidays as well. They are waiting to see if the total number of patients will jump again over the next two weeks, as the virus typically takes two to 14 days to show symptoms in patients.

In the weeks leading up to Christmas Day, doctors have advised families to reconsider holding large gatherings or, at least, making sure all attendees are fully immunized.

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